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Archive for the ‘Quilt Blocks’ Category

IndSum-top

My blogger friend at knitNkwilt posted about an interesting paper-pieced block called Indian Summer.  There’s a free downloadable pattern on Craftsy.com.  I like paper piecing for small projects and the 12-inch block plus a 2-inch border makes a piece that is perfect for my mini-rack….

IndSum-rack

….for two separate spots in my kitchen…..

IndSum-cab

hanger

…and for what we used to call a “stand cover” or table mat….

IndSum-cover

I was able to reduce my bags of black, white and red scraps a bit and have two pieces that will get a lot of use.

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futon-top

Wedding Dress Blue has an interesting quilt-along and tutorial for an easy version of the Lemoyne Star called Super Star that is fun and quick to put together.  Click here for her tutorial.  I have a large, deep-seated sofa that requires large cushions behind my back if my feet are going to touch the floor.  I had salvaged two large foam cushions from a discarded couch and the 16-inch star was perfect when I added some strips and additional half-squares to make the block larger.  I made the block for the front and back of each cushion and chose not to quilt the covers which will have to be laundered frequently.

futon-1

I used only scraps in these two cushion covers, including a large bag of white scraps I had bought last fall in Ohio Amish country.

futon2

futon3

I made a total of 80 half-squares that were 2-½ inches and for this many pieces, I turned to my Wonder Cut Ruler which made quick work of them.

futon4

I also used scraps for the side sections, cutting 6-inch wide strips of various lengths of fabric.
futon-sides

I had salvaged two long zippers from the original cushions and didn’t have to buy anything to complete the project.

futon-zipper

My dog, Addie, wondered when I was going to be finished taking pictures so I could fill her dinner bowl and also when I was going to get out of the way so she could get back to her favorite spot on the couch.

Best-060113

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top
I have a hamper rack on which the hamper portion wore out very quickly.  I wanted to recycle the rack as well as use up a lot of fabric scraps, so I drafted a very simple pattern and used a Log Cabin variation to make the front and back.  The lining is from some old home dec curtains.

The only repair I did on the rack was to replace two side straps.  I cut two pieces 7 x ½ inch of scrap leather (could be from an old purse) and cut a small hole ½ inch from the ends on each piece.  I removed the screws on the broken straps and screwed them through the holes on each end to affix the replacement straps.

sidestrap
The rack measures about 16 inches wide x 25 inches high with ½ inch diameter legs – similar to the hamper racks sold by Ikea.

I used pieced blocks for my hamper, but, of course, any kind of fabric could be used.  Here is what you will need.

SUPPLIES

  • Hamper rack approx. 16 inches wide x 25 inches tall.
  • 2 pieces of fabric 28-1/4 inches wide x 24-¼ inches long for hamper bag
  • 2 pieces of fabric 28-¼ inches wide x 24-¼ inches long for bag lining
  • 10 pieces of fabric 4 inches wide x 6 inches long for tabs
  • 10 pieces of Velcro ¾ inch wide for tabs

HAMPER BAG

  • Place hamper bag fabric right sides together and sew with ¼ inch seams along two sides and bottom.
  • Keeping right sides together, at each side seam on the bottom edge, mark and cut out a 2-½ inch square.

2.5 final

  • Fold the cutout portion of the bag together, placing the seam in the center …..

bott-final…and sew a ¼ inch seam.

cutout-sew

  • Repeat for the other corner. Turn and press.

corner-final

  • Use the same procedure to sew the lining.
  • Make a mark at the top center front of bag.  Then mark 3-3/4 inches two places on either side of the center.  Repeat with back of bag.
  • Pin a square of each set of Velcro pieces centered over each mark with the top of the Velcro patch ¾ inch from top raw edge.  Stitch in place.  Repeat for back of bag.

velcro-final

TABS

  • Along 4 inch edge of the tab fabric, press edge ¼ inch to wrong side of fabric.

strap-fold 2.5 top

  • Fold piece in half lengthwise, wrong sides together, and press.

strp-fold-side

  • Open fabric and fold each side to meet at the center fold.  Press.

strp-fold-center

  • Fold in half lengthwise and press.  Top stitch around sides and bottom of piece.  Repeat with remaining 4×6 pieces of fabric.

strap-sewn

  • On the finished edge of each strap, sew a ¾ x ¾ inch piece of Velcro.

strp-velcro

  • On the wrong side of each tab, mark 1-½ inches from the raw edge.  Place tab inside bag at top edge, wrong sides together, matching 1-½ inch mark with top pressed edge and aligning with the matching piece of Velcro below.  Pin.  Repeat with remaining tabs.

pintabs

  • Place lining inside the bag, wrong sides together, matching corners.
  • Pin every two inches along the top edge.
  • Top- stitch 1/8 inch from top edge, being sure to catch the 1/4 inch of fabric turned under on the bag and lining.

topstitch

  • Place on rack, looping tabs over the rack and securing with the Velcro patches.

finished

The hamper can be folded for storage.

folded

This makes a nice storage unit for lightweight toys (think stuffed animals), sewing, clothing, towels, etc.

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A friend sent my daughter and me really cute wall hangings made from a towel and washcloth.

lori-lw

lori-nb2

We wanted to make something for her and collaborated on a large tote bag.  My daughter did her great embroidery on an 8 inch center panel …

easter3

…and I used my favorite quilt block to frame a picture – 4-½ inch log cabin blocks (1-½ inch center and 1 inch strips).
easter2

I used the same pretty pink calico in the blocks and for the backing and lining.
easter5

Pale green check seems to go with pink so well and serves as an accent on the bag.

easter4
This is a roomy 16 x 20 inch tote and I hope will be used to transport a lot of good stuff.

Click on pictures to enlarge.

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sb43-1

My youngest daughter likes to have a quilted wall hanging in her family room and hinted broadly that she’d like one with some spring colors.  She didn’t have any other ideas and said something with her kids would be OK.  I’ve already made several hangings featuring her kids, so I thought this time it would be nice to feature the pets she has owned since she was married.  I scanned the pictures and then printed them on June Tailor Sew-In Colorfast Fabric Sheets for Ink Jet Printers.

sb43-3

I added borders to the pictures to make 6 inch blocks.

sb43-4

The alternate blocks were simple Diamond in a Square to showcase some beautiful 5 inch florals I had along with some pale green gingham.

sb43-5
For the backing, I used some pink fabric that had been a dress for her daughter a few years ago.  The quilting is simple straight line and stitch-in-the-ditch.  I also made a sleeve (the drapery hooks were used just to take pictures).   The wall hanging measures 30×30 inches.  The label includes pictures of the animals.
sb43-7

The beagle Bailey in the center was her first dog who passed away a few years ago. The rest of the group is still running amuck in her house – the black dog Frank was adopted after he was found abandoned in the neighborhood; Jimmi the Blue Tick Coon Hound came from a local rescue (Recycled Doggies); the cats showed up at her front door on two successive Halloween nights – their names are appropriately Milky Way and Snickers.

My daughter likes having the rest of her “family” featured on a wall hanging.

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linus-top
I wanted to participate in a quilt-along offered by Freda at Impera Magna and try the Disappearing Nine-Patch block.  My problem is that I’m not good at reporting my progress on quilt-alongs and before I know it, I’ve completed the quilt without really participating.

To audition the block, I made a doll’s quilt first ….

AD-1
http://lillianscupboard.wordpress.com/2013/01/31/disappearing-9-patch-qal-and-a-doll-quilt/

Then, I started making a child-size “I Spy” quilt for our local Linus Project which distributes quilts to children in  hospitals.  I used all scraps for this quilt and bought only the fleece for the backing (which the Linus group prefers) and thread.  It turned out to be bigger than I expected – 47 inches wide x 58 inches long.  I’ve been having back problems and didn’t want to wrestle a large quilt through my Bernina.  This quilt was bigger than I intended, but manageable.

Instead of turning the blocks as shown in Freda’s instructions, I simply switched the top right and bottom left square in each block so that my I Spy blocks would not be turned.

D9P-1

linus-cu

linus-cu2

Rather than buy more fabric for the border, I made an extra row of blocks and did not use a border.  I used the fleece as backing and batting and did a very simple quilting pattern on the machine.

linus-bck

I draped the finished quilt over my couch and left the room to get my camera.  When I came back, Addie, the beagle, was well settled on the quilt, looking as though I had made it for her.  Luckily, the Linus group meticulously washes all of the quilts that are donated so I know it will be in good shape when it goes to the hospital.
linus-bot

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ctryfair-top

When I gave my youngest daughter an anniversary mini-quilt and rack in October, I knew I would be supplying new quilts as the occasion arose.  I made Thanksgiving and Christmas quilts, then realized mid-January she didn’t have a quilt for her table topper.  I made what I call an “interim quilt” which means it would work out for non-seasonal, non-holiday display.

Last year about this time, I spent some time making some of Judy Martin’s variations on LeMoyne stars.  I particularly liked this one called “Country Fair“.  The block I made is far from perfect and convinced me I didn’t want to make a big quilt from this block, but I still think it’s nice as a mini-quilt with some strips added to fit the rack.

ctryfair-cu

I quilted it to a fleece backing, added sleeve, label and binding – and my daughter has an interim quilt to display until time to put up the Valentine’s Day decorations.

ctryfair-back

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I wanted to make a table topper for my youngest daughter’s 17th wedding anniversary.  Over the past 17 years, I’ve used the picture of the bride and groom many times.  This time, I wanted to use just the picture of the bride and found the perfect block on crafty.com – an Inverted Star.

This block in a 12-inch size gave me the large center portion to insert a picture of my daughter as a bride printed on  June Tailor Sew-In Colorfast Fabric Sheets.


For the four center blocks I wanted to use a picture of her bouquet and my oldest daughter was able to place the bouquet on a doily and maroon background  to give the flowers the right design elements.  She worked with both pictures to make them perfect for this piece.


I used my daughter’s wedding colors of white and burgundy in this topper and quilted with simple machine stitching.   I had made the dresses for the wedding for the bride, the maid of honor (my oldest daughter) and for me as the mother of the bride. The label includes the remaining small scraps of fabric from each of our dresses.

I was able to buy an Ackfeld 12×14 single scroll stand at a recent quilt show to complete the gift.

My son-in-law could care less about quilts and always receives a check for his gift.  My daughter was very pleased with the table topper when I gave it to her on Sunday, October 14.

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In the 1990s, my oldest daughter and I had a booth in a large craft mall in Cincinnati.  My contributions were mainly decorative art painted on vintage wood pieces and enamelware.  We had the booth for over 4 years and I made and sold countless pieces with designs sometimes from pattern books but mostly from my own sketches.  I’m not painterly at all and just did my thing with pen and ink accentuated with acrylic painting.

Although I haven’t painted anything since 1998, I kept all of my sketches and designs and thought I might be able to incorporate some of them into pieces for wall hangings or my mini-quilt racks.  First, I scanned the sketch which was bigger than I wanted for this project ….

…and then, using a light box, I went over the basic elements of the sketch with pencil.  I then scanned this sketch, made it the size I wanted and printed it onto June Tailor Colorfast Fabric Sheets for Ink Jet Printers.

I left the paper backing on the printed panel and painted the design with acrylic paint thinned with water.  When the piece was dry, I went over it and added details with an ultra-fine point Sharpie pen.  Then, the piece was pressed to set the colors and the paper backing was removed.

These panels were combined with strips of fabric to make them the correct size for my Tri-Stand table topper.  I added batting, binding, a sleeve and a label to complete the panels.  I also added a patriotic button to each that I found half-price at Joann’s.

I was pleased with how the panels turned out and since I don’t intend to wash them, the colors should stay vibrant for a long time.  It made me happy to be able to use an old familiar sketch again and to be able to do a little painting.

This particular design was used for 5 different projects which were sold from our booth.

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