This recipe is based on one from a wonderful book, Cooking from Quilt Country by Marcia Adams. Wholesome ingredients like whole wheat flour and buttermilk go into an easy mixture that bakes into crunchy cereal.

HOMEMADE GRAHAM NUTS

  • 3-1/2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 cups buttermilk
  • 2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a large bowl, combine flour, brown sugar, salt, baking soda and cinnamon.  Add the buttermilk and vanilla, mixing well.

Pour out into an oiled 10-1/2×15-1/2″ flat baking pan and spread evenly.  Dampening your palms with water is an easy way to get the dough spread out evenly.

Bake for 20 to 25 minutes until the batter is firm, medium-brown in color and shrinks slightly from the sides of the pan.  Loosen from the pan and allow to cool on a rack for several hours or overnight.

Preheat oven to 275 degrees F.  Break up the pieces of cereal and pulse in a food processor until coarse crumbs are formed.  Divide the crumbs between two 10-1/2×15-1/2″ jellyroll pans that are lined with parchment paper.  Bake for 45 minutes to an hour, depending on degree of crispness you like.  An hour made the cereal just right for my taste and so it didn’t get soggy in milk.

Let cool, then store in an airtight container.  Since there are no preservatives in the cereal, I would suggest refrigerating or freezing the cereal if you don’t plan to use it within two weeks or so.

Serve as a cold cereal with milk and a bit of brown sugar if desired (I didn’t think it needed additional sugar).  A few raisins and/or walnuts are a nice addition.

Note:  The original recipe called for baking in a 12×16″ flat pan.  I didn’t have that size and added some time to the baking to compensate and also to get the degree of crispness I wanted.

Yield:  Approximately 11 cups of cereal.

This beautiful book, Cooking from Quilt Country, published in 1989, not only has great homemade Amish/Mennonite-inspired recipes but loads of color pictures and information on the Amish and Mennonite people and their culture.  I found my copy in an antique shop, but I notice the book is also available, new and used, at Amazon and on eBay.