stovecardMany of my childhood Thanksgivings were spent in my Grandma’s kitchen where she cooked a big family dinner on a woodburning stove.  I cook for my grandchildren now, gratefully using all the latest conveniences.  My favorite yeast rolls for Thanksgiving are made from a recipe adapted from one that appeared in Better Homes & Gardens Country Cooking magazine (1982-83).  The original recipe called for the more conventional method of proofing, mixing, and rising, but I converted it to a quicker way with fast acting yeast.

I won blue ribbons at the Hamilton County Fair (Cincinnati) and the Ohio State Fair using this recipe in the 1980s.

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BEST LIGHT BREAD

  • Servings: One to two dozen rolls, depending on size
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  • 6 to 7 cups of all-purpose flour
  • 2 pkgs. fast-acting dry yeast
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 cup hot milk (130 degrees F)
  • 1 cup hot water (130 degrees F)
  • 1/2 cup margarine, melted
  • 2 beaten eggs, room temperature

Place 2 cups of flour, yeast, sugar and salt in the large bowl of an electric mixer.  Add the hot milk, hot water and melted margarine and beat for 3 minutes at medium speed, using the paddle beater.  Mix in the eggs.  Insert dough hook and continue to knead dough for another 6-1/2 minutes, adding flour as needed.

Cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes.  Punch down and form into rolls.  Place on greased baking sheets, cover and let rise for 30 minutes.  Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Bake rolls for 12-15 minutes until golden brown.  Let cool on wire racks. 

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For Thanksgiving, I like to make the rolls large – the better for making turkey sandwiches.

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