Welsh Rabbit and Beer Bread Rolls

rabbit-plate

I first made this recipe in 1993, adapted from one in Susan Branch’s Heart of the Home, 1988.  It became a favorite lunch for my two daughters and me, served on a split homemade yeast roll.

In 2008, I had made this dish for my youngest daughter’s birthday and since I had some beer leftover, made a good beer bread from an internet recipe (source forgotten).  I thought this bread would be ideal to serve with the Welsh Rabbit – sturdy enough to stand up under a generous helping of this delicious cheese concoction.  It turned out to be the perfect combination.  The recipe for Welsh Rabbit makes 4 helpings (could easily be doubled) and the bread recipe makes 8 large rolls (leftover rolls are good for dishes like Mom’s Tuna Melt and Balsamic Chicken Melt – or simply toasted for breakfast.

EASY BEER BREAD ROLLS

  • 3-3-1/2 cups all-purpose flour, divided
  • 3 Tblsp granulated sugar
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 package dry fast-acting yeast (1 Tblsp)*
  • 8 oz. beer, room temperature
  • 1 Tblsp butter
  • 1 egg, room temperature

*The “Instant“ or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.  Rising time is cut in half

In a mixer bowl, place 1 cup all-purpose flour, granulated sugar, salt and yeast.  Blend.

Heat beer and butter in microwave to 130 degrees F.

beerbrd1

Insert paddle beater and add beer/butter mixture to flour mixture.  Mix on medium speed for 3 minutes.  Add egg and beat for 30 seconds more.

Insert dough hook and add 1 cup of flour and beat at medium speed.  Continue beating for 6-1/2 minutes longer,  adding additional flour as needed until dough is elastic and no longer sticky.

Place dough in a large greased bowl, turn once, cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes.

beerbrd2

Punch with your knuckles to deflate dough and divide into 8 pieces …
beerbrd3

and form each piece in your hand to make a rustic roll about 3 inches diameter.

beerbrd7

Place on a greased baking sheet, cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes.  Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Bake @ 375 degrees F for 12-14 minutes until bread is browned over the top surface.   Cool on a wire rack. 

beerbrd6

WELSH RABBIT

  • 1 lb. sharp cheddar cheese, diced
  • 2 Tblsp. butter
  • 1 tsp. dry mustard
  • ½ tsp. Worcestershire sauce
  • dash cayenne
  • 2 eggs, slightly beaten
  • 8 oz. beer, room temperature
  • 4 Easy Beer Bread Rolls, split and toasted

My first step is to get out my vintage Kreamer copper-bottom double boiler which I bought at an antique store about 30 years ago.
Kreamer

Melt cheese & butter in top of double boiler over simmering water.

rabbit-cooking

Stirring constantly, add mustard, Worcestershire, and cayenne.  Beat in egg; stir in beer, and stir until hot.  Do not boil.  Serve over split, toasted Beer Bread Rolls.  Serve piping hot.

4 servings 

Note:  Leftover Welsh Rabbit can be used to supplement cheese in any dish such as macaroni and cheese or added to a cream soup.

Published by

quilt32

Lillian Applegate Westfelt was a mother of 4, grandmother of 6, and great-grandmother of 3. She was an 86-year-old widow living in a nice little bungalow with her oldest daughter and a beagle-dachsund named Addie. She passed away in November, 2018.

7 thoughts on “Welsh Rabbit and Beer Bread Rolls”

  1. Do you know, as a child, I thought it was actually a cheese and rabbit thing? =) I love your double boiler. Even more, I love that you use it!

  2. I am sitting reading this in bed but now I want to get up and make Welsh rabbit! The bread sounds scrummy but I especially like your suggestion of using this over pasta. Your boiler is amazing! Abigail x

  3. There are so many great things in this post! First, I love the double boiler – then, I never knew what Welsh Rabbit actually was and it sounds delicious – finally, I have a new wonderful bread/roll recipe to add to my list of must try!

  4. Love the vintage double boiler, so pleased to see someone using their beautiful vintage things too. You know Lillian, language and tradition are so great, coming from the UK originally, we always called this Welsh Rarebit but I think I prefer the much more whimsical sounding Welsh Rabbit! Thank you for sharing.

    1. The dish is sometimes called Rarebit here, too, but this particular recipe used “Rabbit”. So nice to hear from you. Lillian

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s