Pie Carrier – A Tutorial

Dutch pie carr (1)

Whenever I’m invited to a pot luck dinner or picnic, I like to take a two-crust fruit pie.  This kind of pie holds up well en route, can stand the heat and is something that a lot of people don’t make for themselves.

I like to use a carrier to protect it and have designed a pie carrier that works well.  For special people, I leave the carrier with them as a hostess gift.  It would also work well to carry other food items that will fit in an 11×11 inch container.

This is how I made my latest version, using a vintage embroidery pattern for the top of the lid and 3 orphan blocks for the lid lining, carrier and carrier lining.  A few scraps for the side panels and tie handles along with some stiff interfacing completed the supply list:

Front and back:  Cut 2 pieces 11-½ x 11-½ inches (includes ¼ inch seam) fabric
Cut 2 pieces 11-½ x 11-1/2 inches lining
Cut 2 pieces 10×10 inches of stiff fusible interfacing such as Inner-Fuse by Dritz

Sides:  Cut four 3 x 11-½ inch pieces of fabric for carrier
Cut four 3 x 11-½ inch pieces for lining
`    Cut four 2-½ x 10 inches of stiff fusible interfacing such as Inner-Fuse by Dritz

Tie:  Cut two pieces 3-3/4 x 16 inches of fabric
Cut two pieces 3-3/4 x 16 inches of contrasting or lining fabric

Lid:
Cut one piece 11-1/2 x 11-1/2 inches fabric
Cut one piece 11-½ x 11-½ inches lining
Cut one piece 10 x 10 inches of stiff fusible interfacing such as Inner-Fuse by Dritz

Lid flaps:
Cut 2 pieces 11-½ x 2-¾ inches of fabric
Cut 2 pieces 11-½ x 2-3/4 inches of lining
Cut 2 pieces 10-1/2 x 1-¾ inches of stiff fusible interfacing such as Inner-Fuse by Dritz

Binding:  Cut one piece 1-½ inches x 44 inches

Velcro:  Cut two sets of ¾ inch Velcro 10-½ inches long.

STIFFENER
Attach stiffener to lining pieces by centering on the wrong side of each piece and stitching a cross to secure.  Do this for the top, bottom, four sides, lid and two flaps

Dutch PieCarr (1)
TIES
Sew fabric ties right sides together with lining/contrasting fabric, using ¼ inch seams.  Sew two sides and across top of each set (pointing or rounding top if desired).  Trim, turn, press and top stitch each side ¼ inch from edges.

Your pieces should be:
Fabric:
Bottom, 4 sides, lid, 2 flaps, two sewn ties
Lining:
Bottom, 4 sides, lid, 2 flaps – all with stiffener sewn in place.

Dutch PieCarr (2)

Sew four pieces of fabric sides, right sides together,  to four edges of fabric bottom, leaving ½ inch at beginning and ending of seam.

Dutch PieCarr (3)
Fold corners of sides together and sew from raw edge to ½ inch from end

Dutch PieCarr (4)

Dutch PieCarr (5)
LINING

Sew four pieces of lining sides, right sides together, to four edges of lining bottom, leaving ½ inch at beginning and ending of seam.

Pin corners together and sew from raw edge to ½ inch from end.

Fold corners of sides together and sew from raw edge to ½ inch from end.

Pin wrong side of lining in carrier, wrong sides together, matching corners and raw edges.  Baste 1/8 inch from edge.

Pin tie handles to the outside of the carrier at the center of two sides of the carrier.

Dutch PieCarr (7)
BINDING

Join ends of binding with ½ inch seam and pin to top edge of outside of carrier, right sides together.  Baste 1/8 inch from edge.

Dutch PieCarr (8)

Dutch PieCarr (9)
Stitch with ¼ inch seam around edge.  Turn under ¼ inch and hand stitch binding to inside of carrier.

LID:
Sew the fabric flaps to the fabric lid on two opposite sides (flaps should be on sides that do not have flaps).

Sew the lining flaps to the lid lining on two opposite sides (flaps should be on sides that do not have flaps).

Place fabric lid and lining lid right sides together and join with a 1/2 inch seam, leaving a 3 inch opening on one side for turning.  Trim, turn, press and top stitch the lid.

On the two sides that don’t have ties, measure down ½ inch from the top edge of the lining flap on the lid and draw a line.  Center the matching Velcro piece with the top edge of the Velcro covering the line and stitch in place.

Dutch PieCarr (10)
Measure down one inch from the top binding edge of the carrier and draw a line.  Center the matching Velcro piece with the top edge of the Velcro covering the line and stitch in place.

Dutch PieCarr (11)
Place an aluminum 9 inch pie pan in the bottom of the carrier and place the baked pie on top of the aluminum pan.  Place lid on top of carrier and fasten with Velcro strips.  Tie the two tie strips together to form a handle.

Dutch PieCarr (12)

Carry by handle, but keep one hand under the pie for security.

Fresh Apple Pie
                   Fresh Apple Pie
“Can she bake a cherry pie, Billy    Boy?”

Published by

quilt32

Lillian Applegate Westfelt was a mother of 4, grandmother of 6, and great-grandmother of 3. She was an 86-year-old widow living in a nice little bungalow with her oldest daughter and a beagle-dachsund named Addie. She passed away in November, 2018.

12 thoughts on “Pie Carrier – A Tutorial”

  1. Lillian, this is fabulous and thank you so much for sharing it! I’ve wanted to make a casserole carrier and love the idea of making one for pies!! Two questions: will this accommodate a deep dish pie plate? In the instructions where you attach the flaps, do you mean that they’re attached on the sides that don’t have the handles?

    1. Vivian, the base is 2-1/2 inches deep and the lid is flexible so it should be OK for a deep dish 9 inch pie. You could always add an inch or so to the width of sides of the base so it would be a little taller. That shouldn’t affect any other measurement except the ties which already have a little extra length.

      Yes, the flaps are attached to the sides that don’t have handles. Thank you for your interest in this project.

    1. Melissa – after a lifetime in business, I don’t want to sell anything any more. I just want to make things that interest me and give them to people I like.

  2. As usually looks yummy. I like how you used the orphan blocks, very creative. This is really a good idea when making edible gifts for the holiday.

  3. I remember that song. =) The answer is, Yes, and make a carrier for it, too! That’s a wonderful thing to make, and to leave as a gift. I love the stitchery on top. Thanks for the tutorial. I will have to sit down and try it sometime. I always wish I had something in which to carry the pie or casserole dish.

  4. Thanks Lillian for sharing this idea and tutorial too! Great idea! The pies look delicious! Can I ask how get you’re pie crust to’pull away’ from edge and seal well? Thank you. Ps in Ireland we call meat pastry dish a pie while if fruit is the filling it’s a tart!

    1. Naomi, thank you for your comments on pies/tarts in Ireland. As for the pie crust, I tuck the edge of the top crust under the edge of the bottom crust, flatten a little and then crimp. I’ve been making pies (tarts) for so long, it’s difficult to remember why I do things certain ways.

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