Pineapple Angel Food Cake – Two Ingredients

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I saw this recipe on Sew Many Ways and thought it would work out well as a low-fat, low-calorie recipe.  This is an easy two-ingredient cake that is delicious plain at only 166 calories per serving.  It can also be enhanced by the addition of whipped topping, fruit, sauce, etc.  This makes a large 12-serving, 9×13-inch cake.

http://sewmanyways.blogspot.com/2012/08/pineapple-angel-food-cake-recipe2.html

PINEAPPLE ANGEL FOOD CAKE

  • 16 oz. box of Angel Food Cake mix (Betty Crocker)
  • 20 oz. can of crushed pineapple in juice

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Preheat oven @ 350 degrees F
Grease a 9×13 inch baking pan

In a large bowl, place the cake mix and crushed pineapple with juice.  Do not add any water specified on the package.
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Stir mixture to blend – it will foam up.

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Pour into greased pan and bake @ 350 degrees F for 20-25 minutes until top is dark golden brown.

Cool in the pan on a wire rack.

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Cut into 12 servings with a serrated knife or use two forks to pull apart pieces.

Can be served plain or is extra good with a dab of whipped topping and a little pineapple ice-cream topping.
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Based on 12 servings, the plain cake is 166 calories.  Two tablespoons of light whipped topping and one teaspoon of pineapple topping adds 38 calories for a total of 204.  Not bad for a really delicious dessert.

Blueberry Yogurt Crumb Cake

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I like blueberries, but the ones I usually get at the grocery store are a little bland.  I’ve had the opportunity the past two weeks  to buy some fresh-picked blueberries from a local farm (Blooms ‘n Berries in Loveland – Cincinnati area) and my impression of blueberries changed completely.  These were large berries literally bursting with a sharp, tart flavor.  I made my favorite Blueberry Pie, Blueberry Lemon Muffins Blueberry Jam,  Blueberry Chocolate Mousse, and Blueberry Crepes.  I saved some to freeze until the good peaches are at the farm market so I can make a Blueberry Peach Pie.    I had enough berries left to make this wonderful Blueberry Crumb Cake which I first made in 1995  In my binder I wrote:  “8/4/95 – Tried with Smitty’s blueberries (a neighbor).   Excellent.  Best blueberry cake I have tasted.”

I think the Blooms ’n Berries blueberries were even better than Smitty’s and the cake is delicious.

BLUEBERRY YOGURT CRUMB CAKE

  • 2-½ cups (1 pt.) blueberries, divided
  • ½ tsp grated lemon peel
  • 2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour, divided
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • ¾ cup (1-½ sticks) butter
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup blueberry yogurt (two 4 oz. packets)
  • 1 tsp fresh lemon juice

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F

Butter 10-inch baking dish or 10-inch spring form pan.
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In a medium bowl, toss berries with lemon peel.  Set aside

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In a large bowl, combine 2 cups flour with sugar.  Cut in butter.  Set 1-½ cups of this mixture aside for crumb topping.
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In a small bowl, combine remaining ¼ cup flour with soda.  Add to mealy mixture in large bowl and rub in.

In the same small bowl, beat egg lightly.  Stir in yogurt and lemon juice.  Add to dry ingredients in large bowl and stir briefly with wooden spoon until blended.  Fold in 1 cup blueberries.

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Spread batter in pan and scatter remaining blueberries on top.

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Sprinkle with reserved crumb mixture.

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Bake @ 400 degrees F approximately 45-60 minutes or until top is lightly browned and a tester inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean.  Cool on a wire rack.
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Serve warm or room temperature.

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Delicious plain or with the following tangy yogurt cream on the side.

YOGURT CREAM

  • 2 cups frozen whipped topping, thawed (Cool Whip)
  • 1 tsp. lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup of blueberry yogurt (4 oz. packet)

In a medium bowl, combine all ingredients and whisk until thoroughly blended.  Refrigerate covered at least 30 minutes before serving.


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Homemade Applesauce Cake

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Every Christmas, we enjoy watching The Homecoming which introduced the Walton’s and I always wonder how Mama Walton made her Applesauce Cake.  Here’s my version of Livvie’s Applesauce Cake:

HOMEMADE APPLESAUCE CAKE

  • 4 medium tart apples*
  • ¼ cup pitted dates
  • 1-¼ cups all-purpose flour
  • ¾ tsp. baking soda
  • 1/8 tsp. baking powder
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp. allspice
  • ¼ cup canola oil
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 egg
  • ¼ cup chopped nuts

Whipped cream or topping

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F
Grease and flour an 8 inch baking pan

Peel and quarter the apples.  Place in a medium saucepan.  Add water to cover the bottom of the pan and cook on medium low heat until the apples are soft, adding a little water as necessary to keep mixture from sticking.  This will take 15-20 minutes.  Let cool.  Measure ¾ cup of apples into a food processor.  Cut the dates into quarters and place in the food processor along with the cooked apples.  Pulse several times to finely chop the dates and smooth out the apples.  *You can substitute ¾ cup of unsweetened applesauce for the cooked apples.

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Place the flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, cinnamon and allspice in a bowl, whisk together and set aside.

In a separate medium bowl, place the oil, sugar and egg – whisk until smooth.

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Stir the date mixture into the oil/sugar/egg mixture, add flour mixture and stir until flour is absorbed.  Stir in chopped nuts.

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Spread batter in the prepared baking pan and bake @ 350 degrees  F for about 45 minutes until a tester inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean.

Cool cake in pan on a rack.

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6 servings.  Serve with whipped cream or topping.

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Apple Cake with Peanut Butter Icing

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I first made this recipe as a bundt cake in 1987.  It is from a 1978 cookbook, Southern Sideboards.  For today’s dessert, I cut the recipe in half and baked it in a 9×9 inch pan.  Easy to make, easy to work with and definitely good and easy on the tongue.

APPLE CAKE WITH PEANUT BUTTER ICING

  • ½ cup cooking oil
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs, well beaten
  • 1-½ tsp. vanilla
  • 1-1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • ½  tsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup chopped pecans
  • 1-1/2 cups chopped, peeled tart apples

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F
Grease a 9-inch baking pan

In a large bowl, whisk together the oil, sugar and eggs.  Add vanilla.
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Whisk together the flour, soda, baking powder and salt – blend into creamed mixture.  Fold in pecans and apples.  Pour into a greased 9×9 inch baking pan.

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Bake @ 350°F oven for 30-35 minutes until tester inserted in center of cake comes out clean..  Cool in pan on a wire rack.
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Ice with Peanut Butter Icing (below).

PEANUT BUTTER ICING

  • 1/2 cup light brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2 Tblsp. evaporated milk
  • 1/2 tsp. vanilla.
  • ½ cup creamy peanut butter

In a small pan, place the brown sugar, butter and milk and bring to a boil, stirring constantly.  Remove from heat immediately and stir in vanilla and peanut butter.  Beat with a spoon until icing is room temperature and thick.  Spread over cake.

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Servings:  9

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Boiled Raisin Cake – a 1940s Recipe

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One of my Christmas gifts in 2011 was a small 4-½ x 6 inch leather bound book engraved “Cooking Recipes”, purchased in Sugar Creek, Ohio.  The pages are edged in gold and there are 10 index tabs for food categories.  The real gold in this book, though, is the collection of handwritten recipes.  There aren’t a lot of recipes – just 25, 22 of which are desserts.  There is also a page where a child scrawled – Mama probably wasn’t too happy with that.  

The book itself could have been from the 1930s, but I believe the recipes are from the 1945-1950 era.  This is based on a lot of recipes calling for shortening, for using the word “oleo” rather than margarine and the attention given to oven temperatures.  I believe it’s post-World War II because of all of the sugar-laden desserts.  

The handwriting is clear and ingredients are listed correctly, although most of the recipes give no idea of how the item is to be prepared, what kind of pan to use or how long to bake.  That’s why I’ve decided to make each of the recipes, using the products specified, and adding my own instructions.  I like to think that the woman from the 1940s kitchen (who would have been about my mother’s age) would enjoy having someone fuss around with these recipes again and turn out some delicious food for the family.

This cake was new to me and since no directions were given with the recipe, I checked out the internet and found it appears to have been a favorite cake of a lot of people.  It’s a rather plain cake – I made half of the recipe and added a glaze which many on the internet remembered their grandma adding to the cake.  I would consider this a lunch or supper cake – satisfying but not too rich.

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BOILED RAISIN CAKE - A 1940s RECIPE

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cup hot water
  • ¼ cup shortening
  • ¼ cup oleo (margarine)
  • ½ cup raisins
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1-¾ cups all-purpose flour

GLAZE

  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • Approx. 2 Tblsp. Milk

Grease and flour a 9-inch loaf pan
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F

In a large saucepan, place sugar, hot water, shortening, margarine, raisins, cinnamon and salt.  Bring to a boil over medium heat and boil for one minute longer.
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Remove from heat and immediately stir in baking soda – it will foam up.  Allow to cool.

When cool, add flour and beat for 2 minutes by hand right in the pan.

Pour into a greased and floured 9-inch loaf pan and bake @ 350 degrees F for approximately 50-55 minutes or until a tester inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean.  Let set in the pan on a rack for 5 minutes.

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Loosen sides and remove from pan to continue cooling on rack.

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Mix together the powdered sugar, cinnamon and milk to make a thick glaze.  When cake is cool, spoon glaze over top and allow to drizzle down the sides of the cake.

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Makes one 9-inch loaf cake

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Cranberry Cake and Brandy Sauce

This dessert was adapted from a recipe on AllRecipes.com.  I first made it for Christmas dinner in 2004 and my daughter and I loved it.  The original was for a large bundt cake and I cut the recipe in half to make this version which I bake in an antique 7-inch tube pan.  It could also be baked in a 9-inch loaf pan.

CRANBERRY CAKE AND BRANDY SAUCE


Cake

  • 3 Tblsp. butter
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1 cup evaporated milk, undiluted
  • 6 oz fresh cranberries

Sauce:

  • ½ cup butter
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • ½ cup heavy cream
  • 1 Tblsp. brandy

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.  Grease/flour 7-inch tube pan or 9-inch loaf pan.

To make the cake
In a large bowl cream butter and sugar.  In a medium bowl mix together dry ingredients.  Beat flour mixture into creamed mixture alternately with evaporated milk, beginning and ending with flour.   Stir in cranberries.


Pour into prepared pan and bake 50-60 minutes @ 325 degrees F until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean (loaf pan may take longer).

Let cool in pan 10 minutes then remove from pan and cool on a wire rack.

To make the sauce:
In a small pan combine the butter, sugar and cream.  Bring to a boil over medium heat, reduce heat and let simmer 10 minutes.  Remove from heat and stir in brandy.  Drizzle warm sauce over slices of cake.

The sauce is quite rich and this amount is just right for drizzling over 6 individual slices of cake.

6 servings

Pumpkin Angel Food Cake and Topping

I first made this dessert from a magazine clipping in 2002.  I changed a few things and used four 7-½ inch loaf pans to make the cake so it would be easy to freeze some of the cakes for later use.  My husband and daughter loved this dessert.

PUMPKIN ANGEL FOOD CAKE AND TOPPING


1 cup canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling)
1 tsp. vanilla
½ tsp. cinnamon
½ tsp. nutmeg
1/8 tsp. ginger

16 oz box of Betty Crocker One-Step Angel Food Cake Mix


Preheat oven to 350 degrees F

In a small bowl, whisk together the pumpkin, vanilla, cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger.

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, beat the angel food cake mix with the amount of water and according to the directions specified on the back of the box

By hand, fold 1/3 of the pumpkin mixture into the cake batter and then the remaining mixture 1/3 at a time.

Spoon into ungreased tube pan or loaf pans.

Bake in a preheated 350 degree F oven according to the directions on the cake mix box.  I used four 7-½ inch loaf pans and baked for 30 minutes.

Place loaf pans on side on a rack to cool completely for about one hour.

Using a knife, loosen sides of cake from pans and pull up gently from the bottom to remove cakes from pans.

PUMPKIN CREAM TOPPING
5 oz. low-fat cream cheese
½ cup canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling)
½ cup granulated sugar
1 tsp. cinnamon
½ tsp. nutmeg
¼ tsp. ginger
2 cups reduced fat frozen whipped topping, thawed

Combine cream cheese, pumpkin and sugar, beat in spices and flavorings.  A food processor is good for this.  Place pumpkin mixture in a medium bowl and fold in thawed whipped topping.

Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
Yield:  15 servings

According to my DietPower software:
15 servings of cake without topping = approx. 125 calories per serving
15 servings of cake with 3 Tblsp. topping = approx. 225 calories per serving

The cake and/or topping can be placed in freezer containers and frozen with good results.  Nice to have a quick dessert ready in the freezer.

A good way to use for leftover cake:

PUMPKIN APPLE TRIFLE

In a small skillet, melt 1 Tblsp. Butter and add 2 cups of apple slices.  Cook for 5 minutes, then add 1 Tblsp. Brown sugar, ¼ tsp. cinnamon and 1/8 tsp. nutmeg and cook and stir for another 5 minutes.  Let cool.


Break a slice of Pumpkin Angel Food Cake into cubes and place in a dessert dish.  Sprinkle 1 teaspoon of Apple Jack, brandy or orange juice over the cake.  Spoon 1/6 of the apple mixture on top.  Add 2 Tblsp. of whipped topping and a pecan half on top of the apples.  Repeat for 6 servings.  Serve at room temperature or chilled.

Mayonnaise Chocolate Cake – a 1940s Recipe

One of my Christmas gifts this year was a small 4-½ x 6 inch leather bound book engraved “Cooking Recipes”, purchased at an antique mall in Sugar Creek, Ohio.  The pages are edged in gold and there are 10 index tabs for food categories.  

The real gold in this book, though, is the collection of handwritten recipes.  There aren’t a lot of recipes – just 25, 22 of which are desserts.  The book itself could have been from the 1930s, but I believe the recipes are from the 1945-1950 era.  This is based on a lot of recipes calling for shortening, for using the word “oleo” rather than margarine in most recipes and the attention given to oven temperatures.  I believe it’s post-World War II because of all of the sugar-laden desserts.

The handwriting is clear and ingredients are listed correctly, although most of the recipes give no idea of how the item is to be prepared, what kind of pan to use or how long to bake.  That’s why I’ve decided to make each of the recipes, using the products specified, and adding my own instructions.  I like to think that the woman from the 1940s kitchen (who would have been about my mother’s age) would enjoy having someone fuss around with these recipes again and turn out some delicious food for the family.

This is a good, family-style cake – soft and moist, but not too rich.  Normally, I use a reduced-fat, olive oil based mayonnaise but since the mayonnaise is replacing eggs and shortening in this recipe, I went with the full-fat version (Hellman’s Real Mayonnaise).

MAYONNAISE CHOCOLATE CAKE

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup regular mayonnaise (not low fat)
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • ¼ cup cocoa
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp. baking soda

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F for a glass pan, 350 degrees F for a metal pan
Grease and flour a 9 inch baking pan

In the large bowl of a mixer, beat together the sugar, water and mayonnaise.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda and cocoa.

Add the dry ingredients to the mayonnaise mixture and beat on medium speed for 2 minutes.

Pour into prepared pan …

…and bake in preheated oven for approximately 40 minutes or until cake tests done when a tester is inserted in the center of the cake.

Cool in the pan on a wire rack.

Keep cake in pan and when cool, frost with:

VINTAGE CHOCOLATE FROSTING

  • 2 cups powdered sugar, divided
  • ¼ cup cocoa
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ¼ cup butter, softened
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 3-4 Tblsp. cream (or evaporated milk)

Place 1 cup of powdered sugar, cocoa, salt, butter and vanilla in mixer bowl.  Beat for one minute.  Gradually add remaining cup of powdered sugar alternately with cream until of desired consistency.

Frost top of cake.

Makes 9 servings

Orange One-Egg Cake, a 1940s Recipe

One of my Christmas gifts this year was a small 4-½ x 6 inch leather bound book engraved “Cooking Recipes”, purchased at an antique mall in Sugar Creek, Ohio.  The pages are edged in gold and there are 10 index tabs for food categories.  

The real gold in this book, though, is the collection of handwritten recipes.  There aren’t a lot of recipes – just 25, 22 of which are desserts.  The book itself could have been from the 1930s, but I believe the recipes are from the 1945-1950 era.  This is based on a lot of recipes calling for shortening, for using the word “oleo” rather than margarine in most recipes and the attention given to oven temperatures.  I believe it’s post-World War II because of all of the sugar-laden desserts.  

The handwriting is clear and ingredients are listed correctly, although most of the recipes give no idea of how the item is to be prepared, what kind of pan to use or how long to bake.  That’s why I’ve decided to make each of the recipes, using the products specified, and adding my own instructions.  I like to think that the woman from the 1940s kitchen (who would have been about my mother’s age) would enjoy having someone fuss around with these recipes again and turn out some delicious food for the family.

It seems that every cookbook from the 1940s included a recipe for “One-Egg Cake” or “Busy Day Cake” that produced an easy, economical suppertime dessert.

The woman who kept this small recipe journal entered the recipe for One-Egg Cake twice.  On one, she noted that it was from “Mom”.

On the second one, she didn’t acknowledge Mom but did give more complete directions which I thought were a little strange:

“Mix dry junk together.  Then vanilla and 1 egg (rotten if so desired).  Gradually add milk or you’ll have lumpy batter.”

I have a very clear memory of the 1930s-40s, and never heard of anyone using a rotten egg.  I assume it was her idea of a joke.

For my version, I had four big oranges that I needed to use and substituted 1 cup of fresh orange juice for the milk, added 1 tsp. grated orange peel, and omitted the vanilla to make an Orange One-Egg Cake. I used the freshest egg I could find.

ONE-EGG ORANGE CAKE - A 1940s RECIPE

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2-½ tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/3 cup shortening
  • 1-¼ cups granulated sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp. grated orange peel
  • 1 cup orange juice

Preheat oven to 350 F degrees for metal pans, 325 degrees F for glass dishes.
Grease and flour a 9-inch pan or dish.

When I have fresh oranges, I like to wash and dry them, grate the peel on a large piece of waxed paper and juice the oranges.  I use what I need for the recipe and the remainder is frozen for another time.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt.  Set aside.

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, cream the shortening, sugar, egg, and orange peel.

Add the dry ingredients alternately with the orange juice, beating well after each addition.  Begin and end with dry ingredients.

Pour batter into a greased and floured 9-inch pan and bake @ 350 degrees F (325 degrees F for glass dishes) for 30-35 minutes or until cake tests done when a tester is inserted in the center.

Cool in the pan on a wire rack.

Leave in the pan and frost the top with a 1940s version of Orange Frosting:

ORANGE FROSTING

  • ¼ cup margarine, softened
  • 2 cups powdered sugar
  • 3 Tblsp. orange juice

Beat together the margarine and powdered sugar.  Add the orange juice gradually.  If necessary, add a tiny bit more juice or sugar until frosting is of good spreading consistency.

Yield:  6 to 9 servings

This is a nice soft cake with a bright orange flavor.  It would make a good cake for a picnic or cookout.

A 1940s era dishtowel

German Chocolate Cake (A Smaller Version)

My youngest daughter is the only one in the family who loves coconut, so I rarely make her favorite German Chocolate Cake.  She didn’t want a big cake to eat all by herself, so I tried to think of smaller pans I had that would make a layer cake.  I decided to try some 7-1/2 inch loaf pans to make a half-recipe of the original version.  It worked out just right for her to have several generous helpings of delicious cake.  I’m not a big fan of coconut but I did enjoy a small piece of this.

GERMAN CHOCOLATE CAKE (A Smaller Version)

  • 2 oz. Baker’s German’s Sweet Chocolate*
  • ¼ cup water
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • Dash salt
  • ½ cup butter, softened
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • ½ tsp. vanilla
  • ½ cup buttermilk**

*To substitute for German’s Sweet Chocolate, add 2 Tblsp. granulated sugar for each ounce of unsweetened chocolate.

**To substitute for buttermilk, place 1 Tblsp. white vinegar in a measuring cup and add enough milk to reach one cup (8 oz.).  Let stand 5 minutes before using.

Cover bottoms of three 7-1/2 inch loaf pans with waxed paper.  Spray sides with cooking spray.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a small microwave-safe bowl, microwave chocolate and water on high for 1-½ to 2 minutes, stirring after 1 minute, until chocolate is almost melted.  Remove from microwave and continue stirring until the chocolate is completely melted.

Beat egg whites in mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form; set aside.

Mix flour, baking soda and salt in a separate bowl.

In the large bowl of a mixer, beat butter and sugar until light and fluffy.  Add egg yolks, one at a time, beating well after each addition.  Blend in the melted chocolate and vanilla.  Add flour mixture alternately with buttermilk, beating until well blended after each addition – beginning and ending with flour mixture.

By hand, gently fold in egg whites.

Divide batter among the three loaf pans.

Bake @ 350 degrees F for approximately 30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center of a cake comes out clean.   Immediately loosen the sides of the cakes and allow to cool in pans for 15 minutes.

Remove from pans to wire racks.  Remove waxed paper.  Let cool completely.

To Make Coconut Pecan Filling/Frosting

COCONUT PECAN FILLING/FROSTING

  • 2 egg yolks
  • ¾ cup evaporated milk, undiluted
  • ¾ tsp. vanilla
  • ¾ cup granulated sugar
  • ¼ cup plus 2 Tblsp. butter
  • 1-1/3 cups Baker’s Angel Flake Coconut
  • ¾ cup chopped toasted pecans

In a medium saucepan, whisk together the egg yolks, milk and vanilla until well blended.  Add sugar and butter….

…and cook on medium heat for 12 minutes or until thickened and golden brown, stirring constantly.  Remove from heat.

Add coconut and pecans; mix well.

Cool to desired spreading consistency.

Spread 1/3 of the Coconut Pecan Filling/Frosting on top of one layer of the cooled cakes…

…top with a second layer and spread its top with 1/3 of the filling/frosting.   Repeat with the final layer and 1/3 of frosting.

This is a wonderfully soft, delicious cake but I had a little of trouble handling the layers even in this smaller size.  The cake isn’t picture-perfect-looking, but it sure tastes great.