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Category Archives: Knitting

I like to work in color when knitting and early on found a good, free slip-stitch pattern that forms a brick design.  The pattern was originally written for a dish cloth but was easy to convert into a soft, sweet baby blanket .

More recently, I used the same pattern for a scarf for the Arkansas group of Special Olympics.  They specify the use of Red Heart yarn in colors of red, grey, black and white and I designed a scarf using these colors and incorporating the brick pattern.

This group asks for scarves and headbands and I included two headbands with Fair Isle patterns.

The free slip-stitch pattern is available at Ravelry.com

Knit Freedom offers a good class on slip-stitch/mosaic knitting for a fee:  http://knitfreedom.com/classes/double-knitting

 

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I enjoy going to thrift shops and looking for vintage collectibles and china, and since I’ve been knitting have found some good bargains in yarn.  Since 90% of my knitting is for charity, I appreciate finding some nice yarn at a good price.  I was thrilled to find a large plastic bag filled with 17 unopened skeins of Caron Premium yarn in off-white for only $10.00.

I envisioned soft, fluffy baby blankets for my Lakota Indian group and was disappointed when I made a trial swatch to find that the yarn was thick and rather stiff when knitted.  So much for fluffy baby blankets and I made a dishcloth, a table mat and a floor mat.  The yarn worked OK for these projects but I had a lot of yarn and didn’t want to make any more cloths or mats.  Then, I thought it might make a good, strong market bag to carry all the fresh corn and melons I buy at the farmer’s market every summer.  My daughter had a nice pattern for a seamless tote bag that is knit in one piece from the bottom up.  The pattern called for 4mm (#6 US) needles and cotton or DK (baby/sport) yarn.  I used #6 needles with my thick, sturdy yarn and following the pattern for the bag portion exactly, made a very thick, sturdy market bag.  I changed the pattern a bit for the handle which my daughter had made and found to be stretchy.  I made two long I-cords, doubled them and stitched to the center front and center back of the bag to form a shopping bag shape.

 

The design pattern is easy and the project is a good one to work on while watching TV or visiting with friends.

Using the thinner yarn would have produced a bag 13 inches wide x 14 inches deep.  My bag turned out to be 18 inches wide x 17 inches long.

Here is the link for the tote bag:

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/seamless-tote-bag

 

…and here is a You Tube tutorial on how to make an I-cord.  This is another project that is mindless and good for knitting when there might be distractions.  I used the same needle and yarn size to make the I-cord as I used for the bag.

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When I started knitting about a year and a half ago, I didn’t care about doing anything fancy – I just wanted to knit scarves, hats, mittens and … socks.  The scarves, hats and mittens were relatively easy to learn, but, oh boy, the socks.  I tried making a pair early on in my knitting experience and gave up after knitting a pair that was basically not wearable.  I waited awhile and tried again and yet a third time without good results.  At this point, I gave all of my sock/fingering yarn to my daughter who keeps me in gorgeous socks and figured I must have a mental block that kept me from doing what so many knitters consider an easy project.

Last week, I decided to give socks another try when I noticed a pattern on Ravelry called Easy Peasy Socks (“designed with the first-time sock knitter in mind”) by Stacey Trock.  The pattern calls for yarn and needles that would produce a gauge of 6 stitches/inch and I used #3 needles and baby/sports weight yarn to make mine.  I use only circular Magic Loop needles (circular with a long cable) and I was actually able to follow the pattern and make a pair of socks!  Stacey issues a warning:  “This pattern is annotated with lots of helpful hints & notes … it’s sorta like a transcript of what a sock class with me is like.”  And it’s how I felt as I followed along – it was like a class with a very student-friendly teacher.

My big problem has always been the heel flap and gusset, and I was able to do this reasonably well.

I’m now in the process of adapting the pattern so that I can make it with a longer leg length, longer ribbing and in a fingering/sock yarn.  I want to devise a formula that will allow me to make this very nice and “easy-peasy” sock in any size I want and using any needles or yarn that I choose.  More on that later.

Here is Stacey’s free pattern:  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/easy-peasy-socks-for-first-timers

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When I decided to learn to knit in January of 2016, I was interested in making easy, practical items for several charities.  One of them was Knit Your Bit for the National WWII Museum in New Orleans.  All of the information is here:

http://www.nationalww2museum.org/learn/knit-your-bit/how-to-participate.html

In addition to information, there are patterns on this site to use to both knit and crochet scarves.  I knew from my daughter’s experiences from past years that red, white and blue scarves were very popular and that is what I’ve been making.

Recently, though, on the Knit Your Bit Facebook page, I found a pattern for a scarf that has the colors and designs of a National Defense Service Medal.  This medal is a decoration presented to recognize all military members who have served in active duty during a declared “national emergency”.  It is an easy garter stitch striped scarf and interesting with the addition of bright yellow.

To find this pattern, go to the Knit Your Bits Facebook page and search for National Defense Service Stripe Scarf to get the free pattern for a scarf 6 inches wide x 71 inches long, knitted in worsted yarn with size 9 or 10 needles.  Nice item to donate to the museum’s program or to give to your favorite veteran.

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This is another pattern from designer Marianna Mel on Ravelry.com.  The pattern was written to fit a baby of around 3 months, but I used #7 needles and Premier acrylic yarn (color – Cake) to make a dress to fit a baby 6-9 months old.

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The dress buttons in the back.

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The skirt in the pattern is a simple, pretty lace, but I wanted to try out a pleated look using a knit 5/purl 2 garter stitch.

meadow-dress-hat-4My older daughter crocheted the small flowers for the dress and hat.

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The hat is a basic pattern done in the knit 5/purl 2 design.

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This is a good pattern for an advanced beginner and turns out so cute.  It should do well going into the spring months for the South Dakota Pine Ridge baby who receives it.

See Ravelry.com for information on the Lakota group, The Children of Pine Ridge.

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I enjoy making baby and toddler clothes for the Lakota/Sioux Children of Pine Ridge in South Dakota.  A group called the  Sacred Shawl Society collects items through Ravelry.com for young mothers and their children who come to a shelter to escape abuse at home.  They can use all kinds of warm knitted items for both mothers and babies.

http://www.ravelry.com/groups/for-the-children-of-pine-ridge

Marianne Mel on Ravelry.com has so many free patterns for baby sets that are relatively easy for an advanced beginner and turn out beautifully even with limited experience.  This little set is in a newborn size using size #6 needles and DK (baby yarn/sports weight) in variegated pastels.  I had a chance to use three vintage buttons (always happy when I can find 3 to match in my huge tin of old buttons).
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The cap is a basic design sized for a newborn.

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My youngest daughter’s 35-year-old rag doll is just the right size to model the sweater, although her head is way too big for the hat.

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Here is the link to the free pattern:  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/fleur-baby-cardigan-jacket
 

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My favorite designer is an English lady who offers pages of free patterns, mostly for babies and small children.  She also has some items for teenagers and adults along with a few patterns that are for sale.  She can be found on ravelry.com under the name Marianna Mel.  http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/search#query=marianna%20mel

This little vest is called Baby’s Ribbed Vest Top.  For a 9-months size the pattern calls for DK yarn (baby yarn/sport weight) and #6 needles.  I wanted to make a larger size and used #7 needles with #4 worsted yarn to make a size to fit a 3 to 4-year-old child.

It’s very sturdy and warm, good for the cold North Dakota climate where the Pine Ridge Lakota/Sioux children live.  Information on this charity is also on ravelry.com under the tab “groups”.

While I was knitting the sweater, I thought it should have some yellow elephant buttons, maybe because of the grey yarn.  Now, what are the chances that I could go to JoAnn’s and find reasonably-priced yellow elephant buttons?  But I did and I think they are perfect for this little vest which would be nice for either a boy or girl.

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I also made a matching hat, using Marianna Mel’s Ribster Baby Hat pattern except I used some stockinette stitching along with the ribbing.

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There were enough yellow elephants to put one on top of the hat, too.
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I enjoyed making this set.  All of Marianna’s patterns I’ve used so far have been suitable for an advanced beginner with very happy results.

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