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Category Archives: Babies and Young Children

 

My WIP this week is a cute hat, knitted top-down, from a free Ravelry pattern – https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/isabella-hat

This pattern is a bit different because it is made from the top down. Beginning a hat like this can be a bit fiddly but this one goes together very well.

I finished the project from last week, a shawl called “When in Scotland” – https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/when-in-scotland

I had my younger daughter model and think it turned out pretty well.  The true colors are brighter as shown in the first picture.  I added a simple crocheted edging to lengthen it a bit. I wanted to make the shawl about 5 inches longer but ran out of needle space. I’m getting a new 60” long circular needle for my birthday at the end of the month and the next shawl will be the length I want.

This is a nice, easy pattern and makes a very sturdy and warm shawl.

Also finished a scarf and two pair of mittens.


My WIP this week is a shawl called “When in Scotland” from a free Ravelry pattern – https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/when-in-scotland.

In the 2-1/2 years I’ve been knitting, I’ve made only one capelet-type shawl, finished as one of my first projects. I wasn’t anxious to try anything that large (or larger) soon, especially since most of the patterns have a lot of lace and open work which I don’t do well.   I decided to try again when I saw a notation from the Pine Ridge Sacred Shawl group that their girls and women would enjoy receiving shawls. This group prefers items without a lot of open work because of the extremely cold weather in South Dakota, and I found the “When in Scotland” shawl is made very solidly.

I’m adapting the pattern a bit because it’s made in garter stitch which I know would bore me on a large piece. I’m using two colors and a favorite slip-stitch pattern with #8 circular needles and Caron One-Pound #4 worsted.

I finished the older child’s scarf from last week and like how it turned out. I used a lot of yarn I had on hand and it made a nice warm scarf. 

I also finished another scarf, a blue earflap hat and a grey Hurricane hat from a free Ravelry pattern – https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/hurricane-hat. This is a very nice pattern for a top-down hat, this one in a small child’s size.

 


My WIP (work in progress) this week is an older child’s scarf, made for the fall drive at Pine Ridge for hats, scarves and mittens. I’ve made quite a few hats for the drive and I know that is the one item that is likely to meet the goal number. Usually, older kids’ scarves and mittens are more needed, so I’ve been concentrating on these two items. This scarf is made with size #10 needles and scrap yarn. In some cases, I have yarn that is too thin and/or too dark for me to use comfortably. I’ve done double stranding on yarn throughout this scarf and like the “tweedy” effect I get from two colors. I’m also able to pair up yarn that is too thin with medium weight yarn to make the size I need.

This is my own pattern of random-width strips and occasional garter-stitch rows for texture.

I finished the little gift basket from last week: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/striped-basket

I used scrap yarn for this basket and made it a good size for holding a half-pint, wide-mouth canning jar in which I can put candy or small treats. I used the bottom liner for the basket as a lid-topper. The next time, I would make this piece a bit wider to come down further over the lid.  I’m thinking of using this pattern to make some St. Nick gift containers this year.  This is a nice, easy pattern.

Also finished last week: A scarf, a pair of mittens and two small caps.


My WIP (work in progress) this week is a neck warmer/cowl that seems to fit the criteria I’ve been looking for in one of these patterns: no lace, warm and comfortable around neck, extends onto chest about 5 inches. I’m doing this piece in bulky #5 Premier Deborah Norville Collection yarn (Golden) and #9 circular needles. This is a free Ravelry pattern: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/shaded-collar

Finished last week: The Santa Claus mittens which turned out very well.

I added a little round nose. Pattern for nose:
Nose: With pink, CO 3 sts.
Row 1 kfb across: 6 sts
Row 2 purl
Row 3 knit
Row 4 purl
Row 5 k2tog across to make 3 sts
Break off, thread tail through remaining sts, pull up, and tie off. Use CO tail to weave through edge sts all the way around nose piece. Pull up to round out nose. Tie off. Sew to center of face, on top of beard, just below hat brim.


 

I found a really cute, free, easy pattern on Ravelry.com for a baby sweater and used it to make 3 different versions for the Children of Pine Ridge.

https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/presto-chango

The pattern is very clever in making a simple sweater with narrow sides and then adding a detachable panel. Buttons are sewn on the sweater portion and buttonholes are knitted into the panel. The first attempt was a 6-9 months baby sweater in a pretty “creamsicle” color, using the lace panel shown in the pattern. I’m not very good at knitting lace but this one turned out pretty well.

It’s very easy to make up another panel with a different design. I used a really nice cable bunny pattern to make this panel.

https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/bunny-cable-square

The second sweater was made with denim and light blue yarn for a 6-9 months boy size. In this case, I used snaps for the closure and just added a couple of buttons to the top of the panel for decoration.

The third pattern was an adaptation of a favorite baby sweater in which I made the sides narrow to accommodate the panel and used the bunny cable again along with nice buttons. This is for a 12-18 month child and has short sleeves for the spring/summer season.

This was an easy and fun pattern to use and adapt. A sweater along with several spare panels would make a nice gift.

 


 

In the fall of 2017, I found a pattern on Ravelry that has become my favorite for a baby or toddler sweater. The free pattern is here:  https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/baby-sophisticate-2. I bought an additional pattern for children’s sizes and there is also a pattern for purchase for adult sizes.

It’s just a nice, practical, comfortable-looking sweater with a shawl collar. I have only been knitting for two years and often run into sections of patterns that are difficult, but this one was manageable from start to finish.

I made one sweater in the three-month size in a pretty seafoam color and added a matching hat, pictured above.

I also made three toddler (2-3 years) sweaters in dark blue …

…a tan and brown with a checkerboard panel …

…and a red one with fuzzy white trim. On this one, the white, fluffy yarn was so difficult to work with that I just used it as trim and didn’t make the large collar.

On a pattern like this with a lot of increases, I type out a chart like the one below that will tell me how many stitches will be in each section and a total for the end of the row. In this case, when the increases are finished on row 7 there will be 6 stitches on the right and left sides of the sweater, 14 stitches each for sleeves and 26 stitches for the back – total of 66 stitches. In this case, there are 32 rows with the correct number of stitches.  Taking the time to type up this reference and have it with me as I’m knitting saves me from making errors and cuts down on frustration.

INCREASES:
ALTERNATING 8 AND 10 INC – ODD ROWS
EVEN ROWS PURL

R1      2 8 20 8 2                                  40 STS
R3     3 10 22 10 3                               48 STS
R5     5 12 24 12 5                                58 STS
R7     6 14 26 14 6                                66 STS

This is a really nice pattern, enjoyable to knit, and makes good, warm sweaters for the Pine Ridge children.


From the day I started knitting two years ago, Ravelry.com has been an important source of information, patterns and guidance. The one Ravelry benefit I did not use was logging my projects for my present and future reference. I liked reading other people’s project notes but it sounded like too much trouble when I was already struggling with knitting something usable.

Now, that I make 5-10 “usable” items a week, depending on size and how complicated they are, I thought it might be worthwhile to start logging my new projects on January 1, 2018, and started with a very easy baby bib and washcloth pattern – free on Ravelry.

I used this free pattern to make a bib in yellow and in a blue/pink blend, cotton yarn (pictured above).

https://www.ravelry.com/projects/mapledr61/grandmothers-favorite-baby-bib/edit

The charity where I send my baby items mentioned particularly liking to receive washcloths so I used another free pattern to make one to match the blue/pink yarn.

https://www.ravelry.com/projects/mapledr61/baby-washcloth/edit

Both of these are quick, easy items to knit and would make a nice shower or baby gift.

I have several more projects in various stages that are logged into my account.  If I’m careful to note all of the details, it will be an invaluable source of information for me.  Another good reason to be a Raveler.

https://www.ravelry.com/