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Category Archives: hats

The St. Louis Connection

Last Christmas, I made hats and mittens for my son and his family in St. Louis.  My son said he doesn’t wear hats often but did like having this warm one for walking the dog or shoveling snow.  He said he would like to have ear flaps on his hat – not dorky ones with long string ties but something that would cover the ears well without pulling the hat down over the eyes.  My younger daughter found the perfect free pattern for me:

https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/1898-hat

I asked for head measurements and favorite colors and had a hat made for each one when they visited in October.  I’ll have to say the hats are not flattering, but they’re very warm with a double thickness of garter stitch around the brim and 2-inch ear flaps.

When they sent me the measurements, they also included one for their dog, Sugar (as a joke, I’m sure).  I found another free pattern which is basically a tube with ears.  The pattern is called Humiliating the Dog and they do all look a little humiliated.  But they will all have warm ears this winter.

https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/to-humiliate-the-dog


 

My WIP this week is a cute hat, knitted top-down, from a free Ravelry pattern – https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/isabella-hat

UPDATE:  THE ISABELLA HAT IS A GREAT PATTERN, BUT THE ONE I’M MAKING ABOVE IS ACTUALLY FROM THIS PATTERN:

https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/fast–easy-top-down-knit-hat

This pattern is a bit different because it is made from the top down. Beginning a hat like this can be a bit fiddly but this one goes together very well.

I finished the project from last week, a shawl called “When in Scotland” – https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/when-in-scotland

I had my younger daughter model and think it turned out pretty well.  The true colors are brighter as shown in the first picture.  I added a simple crocheted edging to lengthen it a bit. I wanted to make the shawl about 5 inches longer but ran out of needle space. I’m getting a new 60” long circular needle for my birthday at the end of the month and the next shawl will be the length I want.

This is a nice, easy pattern and makes a very sturdy and warm shawl.

Also finished a scarf and two pair of mittens.


My WIP this week is a shawl called “When in Scotland” from a free Ravelry pattern – https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/when-in-scotland.

In the 2-1/2 years I’ve been knitting, I’ve made only one capelet-type shawl, finished as one of my first projects. I wasn’t anxious to try anything that large (or larger) soon, especially since most of the patterns have a lot of lace and open work which I don’t do well.   I decided to try again when I saw a notation from the Pine Ridge Sacred Shawl group that their girls and women would enjoy receiving shawls. This group prefers items without a lot of open work because of the extremely cold weather in South Dakota, and I found the “When in Scotland” shawl is made very solidly.

I’m adapting the pattern a bit because it’s made in garter stitch which I know would bore me on a large piece. I’m using two colors and a favorite slip-stitch pattern with #8 circular needles and Caron One-Pound #4 worsted.

I finished the older child’s scarf from last week and like how it turned out. I used a lot of yarn I had on hand and it made a nice warm scarf. 

I also finished another scarf, a blue earflap hat and a grey Hurricane hat from a free Ravelry pattern – https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/hurricane-hat. This is a very nice pattern for a top-down hat, this one in a small child’s size.

 


My WIP (work in progress) this week is an older child’s scarf, made for the fall drive at Pine Ridge for hats, scarves and mittens. I’ve made quite a few hats for the drive and I know that is the one item that is likely to meet the goal number. Usually, older kids’ scarves and mittens are more needed, so I’ve been concentrating on these two items. This scarf is made with size #10 needles and scrap yarn. In some cases, I have yarn that is too thin and/or too dark for me to use comfortably. I’ve done double stranding on yarn throughout this scarf and like the “tweedy” effect I get from two colors. I’m also able to pair up yarn that is too thin with medium weight yarn to make the size I need.

This is my own pattern of random-width strips and occasional garter-stitch rows for texture.

I finished the little gift basket from last week: https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/striped-basket

I used scrap yarn for this basket and made it a good size for holding a half-pint, wide-mouth canning jar in which I can put candy or small treats. I used the bottom liner for the basket as a lid-topper. The next time, I would make this piece a bit wider to come down further over the lid.  I’m thinking of using this pattern to make some St. Nick gift containers this year.  This is a nice, easy pattern.

Also finished last week: A scarf, a pair of mittens and two small caps.


My daughter recommended this pattern to me and I love it. I enjoy doing Fair Isle patterns and this one seems to go together especially well. It has become my favorite heart pattern, found on Ravelry.

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/love-the-winter-hat

I tried the pattern first on a hat in grey and peach worsted (pictured at the top). This is destined for the Pine Ridge Lakota drive that is held every fall to provide winter wear for the school children.

The second hat is in the required yarn/colors of the Iowa Special Olympics. I hope this will help a little girl keep her ears warm while competing.

I’ve made up my own chart for making this heart pattern in different colors because I know I’ll be using it often in all kinds of hand-knit items.

 

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goldturban-sbMy younger daughter looks so much better in hats than I do

I follow a Facebook page called Addicted to Knitting which features knitted items that people have made, a lot of question/answer sessions and a very nice group for reading about what others are doing all over the world.  I saw one picture of a turban hat that a lady had made of deep purple yarn with a large purple gemstone in the center and was inspired to look up the free pattern by Bernat on Yarnspirations.comhttp://www.yarnspirations.com/patterns/turban-twist-hat.html

I didn’t have any purple yarn on hand but did have some Lion Brand Heartland yarn in the Yellowstone color which was nice and soft and worked well in this project, using #8 needles

It’s basically a long narrow scarf in an easy Seeded Rib pattern …

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…which is folded and sewn in place to form the turban.  The scarf was easy to make.

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Although the pattern comes with a diagram on how to fold and sew the turban, it was confusing to me and I’m showing how I got it together.  First mark the center of the scarf and then fold into this shape.

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Fold the two ends back to meet in the center and pin in place.

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Starting in the center and using a yarn needle with some scrap yarn of a different color, loosely baste each end in place, leaving 4 inch tails to make it easier to remove the waste yarn.

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Using another piece of waste yarn, stitch the center section where the two ends meet.  Baste as far as where the two pieces cross.

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At this point, put the hat on yourself or some volunteer and pin to close any gaps on top of the hat, basting them in place with waste yarn.

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Baste and try on the hat as many times as necessary to be sure it is the way you want it.  Then, using matching yarn, stitch the turban together, pulling out the waste yarn as you go.

I sewed a big vintage button on the front of my turban.

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1/9/17

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