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Category Archives: scarves

My daughter passed on to me a link to a free pattern to make a “simple asymmetrical scarf … intended to display gradients in handspun yarn”.  I didn’t have any handspun yarn, but I did have a “Sweet Roll” cake of yarn from JoAnn’s and decided to give this a try since it was all in easy garter stitch.  It starts out with 5 stitches cast on and ends when you run out of yarn.  This is how my scarf turned out.

 

My daughter used a Caron cake with about twice as much yarn and made a gloriously long and swervy scarf.

It’s a nice pattern to really show off the colors in these cakes.  The sections of each color are large so you need a big project to display them to best advantage.

Here’s the free pattern:

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/boom


Last week, I found some bargains which will help me out with my knitting.  First, a book from a library used book sale for only $4.00.  I figure if I can find one pattern or technique that I like in a book, it’s worth buying.  I’ve already found one very good pattern and there are 43 more to audition.  I particularly liked a pattern for a hooded scarf.

The other bargain was at a Goodwill thrift store where I bought a huge container of acrylic yarn for $10.00.  There was one skein each of a large assortment of colors.  This is good for me because I knit a lot of small items like hats, scarves and mittens for charity.  The hooded scarf pattern called for #4 worsted yarn and #8 needles for a child’s size scarf.  I used #10 needles with the yarn and added a few rows to make it suitable for an adult.  I had a nice variety of acrylic yarn to choose from.

Using the same pattern and needles with worsted yarn, I made a version with a short scarf that buttons in front.


I’m currently working on another long-scarf version, using some more of the bargain yarn.

I still have a lot of yarn and a lot of patterns to use.

The real bargain in the large container of yarn was hidden until I got it home and started sorting it out.  There were 8 two-oz. unopened skeins of this yarn in a beautiful dusky blue-violet color.

I checked on the company web site and this wool yarn sells for $16 a skein!  I gathered it up and gave it to my younger daughter, an experienced and excellent knitter who will make good use of such a great bargain.


This is a great, easy pattern for 5 basic shawl shapes: Square, Circular, Triangular, Semi-Circular, and Heart-Shaped.  http://www.laylock.org/?s=5+basic+shawl+shapes

Each style begins with casting on three stitches and is worked to a full-sized shawl or stopped at any point for a smaller scarf, which I did. The pattern calls for garter stitch but can be made in any stitch or pattern you choose (be sure to knit 5 stitches on each end of each row to keep edges from curling). The size will depend on what yarn/needles are chosen.

I made a child’s size triangular scarf out of scraps of baby yarn (above) and an adult sized scarf with a vintage button added.

Note that the scarves are worked top-down and the beginning three stitches will form a part of the top of the scarf.

This is a fun project and a good way to use up small amounts of yarn.

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goldturban-sbMy younger daughter looks so much better in hats than I do

I follow a Facebook page called Addicted to Knitting which features knitted items that people have made, a lot of question/answer sessions and a very nice group for reading about what others are doing all over the world.  I saw one picture of a turban hat that a lady had made of deep purple yarn with a large purple gemstone in the center and was inspired to look up the free pattern by Bernat on Yarnspirations.comhttp://www.yarnspirations.com/patterns/turban-twist-hat.html

I didn’t have any purple yarn on hand but did have some Lion Brand Heartland yarn in the Yellowstone color which was nice and soft and worked well in this project, using #8 needles

It’s basically a long narrow scarf in an easy Seeded Rib pattern …

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…which is folded and sewn in place to form the turban.  The scarf was easy to make.

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Although the pattern comes with a diagram on how to fold and sew the turban, it was confusing to me and I’m showing how I got it together.  First mark the center of the scarf and then fold into this shape.

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Fold the two ends back to meet in the center and pin in place.

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Starting in the center and using a yarn needle with some scrap yarn of a different color, loosely baste each end in place, leaving 4 inch tails to make it easier to remove the waste yarn.

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Using another piece of waste yarn, stitch the center section where the two ends meet.  Baste as far as where the two pieces cross.

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At this point, put the hat on yourself or some volunteer and pin to close any gaps on top of the hat, basting them in place with waste yarn.

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Baste and try on the hat as many times as necessary to be sure it is the way you want it.  Then, using matching yarn, stitch the turban together, pulling out the waste yarn as you go.

I sewed a big vintage button on the front of my turban.

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1/9/17

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