Mug Bag-Mug Rug as Easter Gift

eastermug (4)

Red Brolly is offering a free pattern for a really cute, easy-to-make mug carrier and mug rug.  http://www.red-brolly.com/2015/03/butterfly-mug-bag-have-you-made-yours/

Update 9/20/15 – A reader let me know that there is a problem with the above link and sent me some alternate ones for the pattern itself.  She said these links are intermittent but she was able to get a printout of the pattern.

The bag is designed to hold a medium sized mug about 6 inches tall x 3 inches diameter …

eastermug (10)
and has a pocket for some teabags.

eastermug (3)

eastermug (5)
There is an accompanying mug rug which folds up in back of the mug bag.

eastermug (9)
I have made four versions of the bag to use as gifts.  I made this one as an Easter gift for my granddaughter.

eastermug (2)

The fabric is from scraps of an Easter dress I made for her in 2011, back before she became a sophisticated going-on-12 lady who doesn’t wear pretty lace-trimmed dresses any more.

11068065_10203699635673366_1756190618_o

Instead of a mug, I’m using an 8-oz jar of jelly beans in the bag and will be putting a gift card in the pocket.

eastermug (1)

For my two daughters, I’ll have the mugs filled with candy and will have gift cards in the pocket.
eastermug (8)
I made one bag/rug to have ready to give to a good friend from Chicago who visits during the summer.
eastermug (6)
In her case, I made an embroidered mug rug that shows a painter because she’s a gifted artist.

eastermug (7)
I enjoyed making these bags and rugs out of scraps, including using up a lot of small batting pieces.  I included a snap and vintage button on each one.  It’s a pleasant afternoon’s project with just a bit of hand sewing.

Red Brolly’s post has some beautiful bags made from her pattern by other readers.

Click on pictures to enlarge.

Sew Sweet Simplicity Panel Curtains

010

Last week, when I completed my Sew Sweet Simplicity BOM blocks and made them into kitchen curtains, I said I would post pictures of the curtains as soon as a non-snowy and sunny day came along.  Well, there are still some small hills of snow around, but the sun is bright and the sky is blue – so, here are the curtains.   The top picture shows the bay window area and this is the panel over the sink.

011

I tried several approaches to making the blocks into curtains and decided to use a simple, streamlined method of using the blocks with sashing and borders to make panels which are very much like wall hangings with a sleeve on the back rather than regular curtain casings.  I wanted the panels to hang similar to a blind without any gathers.

003

This project worked out well for me and at a distance and in the right light, the panels look almost like stained glass windows.

002

Projects From a Box of Discards

Quilty-StN (4)

A couple of weeks ago, my neighbor asked my daughter and me to come to her house to check out some sewing/craft supplies she was going to throw away or donate.  She knew my daughter and I did a lot of sewing, needlework, quilting, crafts – and thought we might find something we could use.  Naturally, we could hardly wait to go across the street and see what was in those boxes!

There were two big cartons full of sewing notions, craft supplies, miscellaneous fabric and even a pair of worn-out jeans.  My daughter used the waistband from the jeans along with some of the white fabric in the box to make a great bracelet/cuff.

Quilty-StN (5)

I was excited to use a red luncheon cloth that was a nice heavy fabric and had only a small stain on it.  I made three lined bags with it, also incorporating some of the white fabric and a couple of pieced/embroidered orphan blocks.

Quilty-StN (3)

Quilty-StN (7)

Quilty-StN (6)

I also made a two-piece cushion set for my vintage folding chair.

Quilty-StN (1)

Quilty-StN (2)

The wonderful part of this story is that we have hardly made a dent in the contents of the boxes.  We have plans for the Christmas season and well beyond it.

 

Halloween Vintage Embroidery

hallo1023 (4)

I’m continuing with projects that use vintage embroidery and lots of autumn-colored scraps.  I found this free pattrn online and made it into a place mat.

hallo1023 (3)

I embroidered another vintage pattern and added fabric to make a Halloween pillow.

hallo1001 (4)

The scary, feathered owl was a birthday gift from my younger granddaughter who liked it so well that she bought one for herself.

hallo1001 (4)

I made a pillow set for my vintage folding chair.  This design is based on a Helan Barrick decorative painting pattern that I first used about 25 years ago.

hallo1023 (1)

hallo1023 (2)

It’s fun to take the embroidered pieces and figure out what I can do with them, using scraps and reducing the amount of leftover fabric I have to store.

Fall Embroidery and Quilting Projects

002

I’ve made a few pieces that incorporate my TV-time embroidery panels.  I made another set of cushions for my vintage folding chair.  The nice thing about a folding chair is that it can also go outside very easily.  I just happened to have a blue granite ware coffee pot and skillet to accompany the cushions.
005

One of the designs I used for embroidery on a table mat is an adaptation of a decorative painting pattern by Helan Barrick.  I used to love to paint her Amish boys and girls.  I adapted this one for fall.

Boy-scarecrow (4)

Boy-scarecrow (2)

I used another vintage embroidery pattern to stitch a scarecrow with a crow on his shoulder.  I outlined the pattern in black embroidery floss and then used crayons to color the design.  After using the crayons, I placed a piece of white paper on top of the panel and pressed with a hot iron to set the colors.

Boy-scarecrow (5)

Boy-scarecrow (7)

I made a quilt for my table mini-quilt rack with a 1930s-40s era pattern of a scarecrow and chubby birds.  I especially like the way the trees are worked in this piece.

001

004
Now, it’s time to think about some small projects for the Halloween season.

Click on photos to enlarge.

Vintage Embroidery

Whenever my two daughters and I get together, they always pull out some kind of handwork to do – knitting, crocheting, embroidery, tatting.  Since I’ve always done my piecing and quilting by machine, I rarely have something to work on.  I decided to try some very simple embroidery using vintage 1930s-40s style patterns.  They are easy enough for my limited skills and I like the patterns which remind me of the embroidery all of the women in my family were doing in that era.  My daughter and I have a large collection of vintage patterns and I’ve been able to add patterns from some good online sites.

I embroider the panel (usually 8-½ x 8-½ inches) and then use scraps to make up something useful.  I don’t want to gather a drawer full of embroidered squares, so unless it’s a seasonal pattern, I make it up quickly.  Another goal of mine this year has been to eliminate bags of small scraps – smaller than 4×4 inches – and I’ve managed to do that.  The only fabric I’ve bought up to this point is some good off-white fabric for embroidery and to use to assemble the scrap blocks.  Here are some of the items I’ve finished this summer:

A cushion set for my vintage folding chair ….

007

005

A small wall hanging of an old kitchen stove …

kitstove

kitstove-cu

A pillow with a design I adapted from an old postcard …
chick-full

chick-cu

A wall hanging with a crow and sunflower center.  I hand quilted around this design and machine quilted the remainder of the hanging.
crowSF-full

Crow-SF-center

A table pad with a Mexican theme …

82815

82816

I still have a stack of completed embroidered panels to use.

82821

Here are some links to free vintage embroidery patterns:

http://mytransfers.blogspot.com/
http://www.patternbee.com/FREEPATTERNS3.html
http://www.french-knots.com
http://www.needlecrafter.com

Click on photos to enlarge.