Country Turkey Wall Hanging

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I bought this pattern while I was in Holmes County (Ohio) Amish Country earlier this year.  I thought it would make a nice wall hanging in my cheerful yellow kitchen.  The pattern is by Becky & Me and the basic pattern measures 16×16, a nice size for a pillow or a wall hanging. 

I used the fusible method of applique and decorative stitching to complete the project.  It has a nice country look for the Thanksgiving season.

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Autumn at the Township Park

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We have a beautiful little park close to my house in Loveland, Ohio, where I like to take my dog, Rusty, and my four-year-old granddaughter.  There is a nice play area for Dolphin ….

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For over a year, Dolphin has been fascinated by a huge tree that was cut down and is still there near a big stump. 

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On Halloween Day we were surprised to find a face carved on the stump – so appropriate to the day.

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There’s a beautiful bridge that connects two playgrounds and leads to a trail in the woods (Rusty’s favorite spot).

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To add to the fun, there’s a pretty lake with ducks and usually a bunch of kids feeding them.  Rusty’s not choosy – he’ll sniff anywhere.

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All in all, it’s a nice place to spend some time on a sunny autumn afternoon.

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Nantucket Cranberry Pie

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Maybe it’s because I was born and raised in southwest Ohio, far from Nantucket, but I had never heard of a Nantucket Cranberry Pie until I noticed one on a blog by Live, Love, Laugh and Learn.  For anyone who isn’t familiar with this dessert, it’s not a pie at all – no pastry crust, a thin layer of filling and nothing underneath the filling.  It’s not a cobbler although a batter is poured on top of the fruit.  The thin cake topping does not rise but is buttery rich and delicious.  It’s also not a cake because each layer is thin and just supports the other.  But this dessert, whatever it is,  is especially good and just meant to be eaten at a table in front of a window looking out on  a clear blue autumn sky and  falling leaves.

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NANTUCKET CRANBERRY PIE

Filling:

  • 2 cups fresh cranberries
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup walnuts, chopped

Topping:

  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup butter, softened
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp. almond extract

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.  Butter a 10″ pie plate.  Place the cranberries in the pie plate and toss the sugar and walnuts over the berries.

For the topping, cream the eggs and the butter with the sugar.  Add the flour and almond extract to the egg mixture, lightly tossing with a fork.

Pour the topping over the cranberry mixture.  If it’s difficult to get the topping to extend out over the filling, press down with water-damped hands to even it out.  Bake for approximately 45 minutes @ 350 degrees F.  Place on a rack to cool.

Serve warm with whipped cream.

Yield:  8 servings

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Primitive Stuffed Pumpkin

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I’m not an accomplished craft person, but I was able to make some cute stuffed pumpkins from a free pattern on Quilt in a Day, (see update below) called the Fall Pumpkin Patch.  There’s a small amount of sewing involved, and then some winding of jute twine and gluing of silk leaves.  I used some white chenille salvaged from a damaged vintage bedspread, but any type of fabric could be used.  The size and shape of the pumpkin depends on the amount of fabric used and good directions are given.  I gave a pumpkin to each of my daughters for Halloween, with the thought that they could stay on display through Thanksgiving.

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Update:  It was brought to my attention that the free pattern apparently is no longer available on Quilt-in-a-Day.  My personal instructions are below:

Supplies Needed:

  • 1/4 yd. pieces or fat quarters or any size pieces of fabric for the pumpkin
  • Green, brown or orange pipe cleaners
  • Tacky glue
  • Raffia strands
  • Jute twine
  • 2″ wooden stems from tree branches
  • Fall silk leaves – 2-3 per pumpkin

All of the pumpkins are made from rectangles.  They can be any size you like (9″x18″, 9″x21″, 7″x17″, etc.).  According to the dimensions they will come out short and fat or tall and skinny.

Fold rectangle in half, right sides together.  Leave a long tail of thread as you begin to sew and stitch a 1/4″ seam down the side of the rectangle.  Leave another long tail of thread attached after you finish sewing.

With a hand sewing needle, thread one tail into the needle and gather up one end of the tube from the wrong side of the fabric, 1/8″ from the bottom edge.  In other words, sew a straight line across one end 1/8″ from the edge.  Pull tightly and knot off.  Turn tube to right side.

Stuff the pumpkin with polyester stuffing or batting scraps.  With the hand sewing needle and thread tail at the other end of the pumpkin, sew a straight line across 1/8″ from the edge, pull tightly and  knot off.   The opening will be covered by the silk leaves.

Using Jute twine, leave an 8″ tail.  Starting from the top of the pumpkin, wind down the sides on the seam line to the bottom, back to the top on the other side, then turn slightly and do it again, leaving thumb or finger on top to keep twine in place.  Make 6 or 8 ridges.  Tie a knot tightly at the top and then a bow.

To decorate, glue a wooden stem into the top center opening withTacky glue.  Wind the pipe cleaner around a pencil and fold in half.  Glue the pipe cleaner into the opening.  Make a bow out of raffia and glue into the opening.  Glue 2-3 leaves to the top to cover the opening.

Display with pride.