Frontier Bread


I first made this bread in 1989 and for some reason did not make a note of the source.  It won a ribbon at the county fair that year and is a good, hearty bread – wonderful toasted.

This recipe will make a 9 inch loaf.  Since I wanted two large rolls for another dish, I used 1/3 of the dough for the rolls and the remainder for a 7-½ inch loaf.

FRONTIER BREAD

  • Servings: One 9-inch loaf or one 7-1/2 inch loaf plus 3 rolls
  • Print

1 cup whole wheat flour
¼ cup yellow cornmeal
1 Tblsp. fast-acting dry yeast*
1 tsp. baking powder
¼ cup dry buttermilk
1 tsp. salt
3/4 cup water (130 degrees F)
2 Tblsp. canola oil
3 Tblsp. honey
1 egg plus one egg yolk, room temperature  (reserve egg white for topping)
2-3 cups all-purpose flour, divided

1 Tblsp. cornmeal for sprinkling in pan
Reserved egg white mixed with 1 tsp. water
1-½ Tblsp. sesame seeds

*I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast, “Quick Rise” in Canada.  This yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.

In large mixer bowl combine 1 cup of whole wheat flour with cornmeal, yeast, baking powder, dry buttermilk powder and salt until blended.

Heat water and oil to 130 degrees F and add to dry mixture along with honey and egg plus egg yolk.  Beat 3 minutes with a paddle beater at medium speed.

Insert dough hook and beat for 6-½ minutes longer, gradually adding all-purpose flour until dough is elastic and smooth.  It will still be a little bit sticky because of the honey.

Place in a greased bowl …

… cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes.  Punch down dough and let rest for 10 minutes.

Form into loaf and/or rolls and place into greased pan which has been sprinkled with cornmeal.

Cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F

Brush the top of the loaf with the egg white/water mixture.  Sprinkle with sesame seeds.

Bake @ 375 degrees F 12-14 minutes for the rolls, approximately 12 minutes for the rolls, 30 minutes for the 7-½ inch loaf and about 45 minutes for the 9 inch loaf.   Remove from pans to a wire rack to cool.  

Delicious fresh and warm with a dab of butter or toasted to enjoy with your morning coffee.

Buttermilk Pralines

Making candy, especially with a thermometer, is not one of my strong points, but these pralines always turn out well – buttery and full of toasted pecans.  I first made them in 1986, using a recipe card from Saco Buttermilk Powder.  I like this powder very much and use it a lot in lieu of having a quart of buttermilk in the refrigerator all the time.

BUTTERMILK PRALINES

  • Servings: Approx. 15, depending on size
  • Print

  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1/4 cup Saco Buttermilk Powder
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 Tblsp. butter
  • 1-1/2 cups toasted pecan halves
  • 1 tsp vanilla

Line a large cookie sheet with foil and butter the foil.

In a large heavy pot (like a Dutch oven), combine the sugar, soda, salt and buttermilk powder.  Stir in the cup of water. Insert a candy thermometer and bring mixture to a boil over high heat (#9 on my gauge), stirring constantly until mixture reaches 210 degrees on the thermometer.

Reduce heat to medium  (#6) and stir in butter and pecans.  Continue cooking over medium heat, stirring often, until mixture reaches 230 degrees on the thermometer.  Remove from heat and add vanilla.

Allow mixture to stand in pan for 5 minutes, then beat with a wooden spoon for 5 to 8 minutes until mixture loses its gloss and begins to thicken.  Drop in mounds on the buttered foil and allow to cool.

Makes about 15 pralines, depending on size.

This candy is forgiving – even when it’s not perfect, it’s so delicious with its buttery caramelized sugar holding together big toasted pecans that no one notices any little flaws.  Just the kind of candy for me to make.

In Praise of Buttermilk

Growing up in the years of the Great Depression, we didn’t have milk except from a can.  My mother loved buttermilk but there wasn’t any available in those hungry years.  When my mother was 73, she made an audio tape of family stories and her personal memories.  She said, “It was depression time and we all lived together – one big happy family!  And when you went to the table to eat you had better fill your plate up because it was never going to be passed around again – that was the only chance you were going to get.  But John (her step-father) would not take any kind of welfare or anything, he insisted on working.  And then we moved to Cincinnati where he got a job shoeing mules and the house went with us and the two boys, Frank and my husband, drove John around with blacksmith tools in the back of the car and he would go around and tell the farmers that their horses needed shoeing whether they did or not – even just a re-setting, that was $1.00 a shoe – and he would always come home with some groceries.”

The “house” consisted of the grandparents, my parents and their two children, two teenage boys, two teenage girls and an infant, all living together and trying to survive on the meager earnings of the traveling blacksmith and his two young sons.

In 1935, my father was able to get on the WPA as a laborer and he moved his little family to a one-room flat in downtown Cincinnati.  My mother always said the happiest day of her life was the day she moved into that little room and was finally able to have a place of her own.

My little sister and I continued to have our evaporated milk diluted with water and heavily sugared.  When I went to the first grade at old Raschig School on Central Parkway, imagine my delight at seeing a table wheeled into the room with apple butter sandwiches and huge metal pitchers of honest-to-goodness milk.  My father, remembering the farm-fresh milk of his childhood, straight from the cow, said this was just surplus skim milk provided by the government.  No matter, nothing ever tasted so good to me.

I always loved milk and as I grew older, I learned to appreciate my mother’s favorite, buttermilk.  Whenever we went to a county fair, Mother and I had the treat of a fish sandwich and ice cold buttermilk.  My father was sure we were going to get violently ill from such a combination but we never did.  We both loved that little half-pint carton of milk with big flakes of butter floating around in it.

When I have a cup of buttermilk left over, I like to make these yeast rolls – very simple – very quick – and very good.

EASY BUTTERMILK YEAST ROLLS

  • 5 to 5-1/2 cups all-purpose flour, divided
  • 3 Tblsp. granulated sugar
  • 2-1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 package fast rising yeast
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1/3 cup vegetable or canola oil

In a large mixer bowl place 2 cups of flour, sugar, salt, soda, and yeast.

Heat the buttermilk and water to 130 degrees F.  Add to the flour mixture.  Add the oil.  Beat with mixer paddle at medium speed for 3 minutes.  Insert dough hook and beat for 6:30 minutes longer, adding flour as needed until dough is elastic and no longer sticky.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes.

Punch down dough, form into rolls and place on greased cookie sheets.  Cover and let rise in a warm place for another 30 minutes.  Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Bake rolls in a preheated oven for approximately 12 minutes until golden brown.  Remove to a wire rack to cool.

Makes approximately 18 rolls, depending on size.