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Tag Archives: drop cookies

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At Christmas time, I found  Hershey’s Sea Salt Caramel Chips which were new to me and put them aside while I was baking my standard Christmas favorites.  My daughter and I were going to attend an Appalachian “Ringin’ in the New Year” event and something was needed for potluck dinner.  There never seem to be enough cookies for children at these dinners, so I thought I would try out the new chips.

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There was a recipe on the package which may be very good but it was for a chocolate cookie and I wanted a vanilla cookie that would be easy to pick up, not crumbly and that would not spread out too much.  I adapted the recipe to meet these requirements and thought the cookies were delicious.  My younger daughter is not given to lavish praise and when she rated them “fabulous”, I figured I had a winner.  They went very fast at the dinner.

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Salted Caramel Chip Cookies

  • Servings: Approx. 40 cookies
  • Print

½ cup (one stick) butter or margarine, softened
¾ cup packed light brown sugar
½ cup granulated sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract
½ tsp. baking soda
¼ tsp. salt
1 egg
2 cups all-purpose flour
1-2/3 cups (10 oz. pkg.) Sea Salt Caramel Baking Chips (Hershey)

In a large mixer bowl, cream the butter/margarine, brown sugar and granulated sugar.  Beat in the vanilla, soda, salt and egg.

Gradually add and mix in the flour and chips.

Drop by tablespoon onto parchment covered baking sheets and flatten cookies very slightly.  Bake in a preheated 350 degree oven for approximately 9 minutes until cookie is set.  Do not overbake.

Cool slightly, remove to wire rack to cool.

Makes about 4 dozen cookies. 

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JoyGinger (10)

One of my readers commented on a vintage recipe for molasses cookies (recipe here) and asked if I had a 1940s era recipe for ginger cookies.  As a wedding gift in 1952, I had received the 1952 edition of Joy of Cooking which was a later edition of the 1931 cookbook.  I think these cookies come from the 1930-1940 era.  They are easy to make and yield a big batch of spicy, old-fashioned cookies.

JOY GINGER SNAPS

  • Servings: Approx. 80 1-1/2-inch cookies
  • Print

1 cup margarine, softened
1 cup dark brown sugar
1 egg
1 cup molasses (Grandma’s, sorghum)
1 Tblsp. red wine vinegar
4 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp soda
1 tsp salt
4 tsp ground ginger
½ tsp cinnamon
2 Tblsp. granulated sugar for dipping

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F

In a large mixer bowl, beat margarine and brown sugar together until well blended.  Add egg, molasses and vinegar – beat until smooth.

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In a separate medium bowl, whisk together the flour, soda, salt, ginger and cinnamon.  Add to margarine/sugar mixture and beat just until flour is absorbed.

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Drop by measuring teaspoon full onto ungreased cookie sheets.

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Dip a small juice glass in granulated sugar …

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and flatten cookies to about ¼ inch thick.  Leave 2 inches space between cookies.
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Bake in preheated 375 degree  F oven for 7-½ minutes.  Remove cookies immediately to rack to cool.

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Will make 80 cookies 1-½ inches diameter.

For 2-½ inch diameter cookies, drop dough by measuring tablespoon full onto sheets and flatten with glass dipped in sugar.  Bake for about 8 minutes.

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I hate to throw away food, even one cup of potato chip pieces.  These cookies are a good way to use up the chips and have a nice, crisp cookie to enjoy.  The peanut butter chips add a nice additional flavor.

POTATO CHIP-PEANUT BUTTER COOKIES

  • Servings: Approx. 2 dozen small cookies
  • Print
  • ½ cup light brown sugar
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • ½ cup butter, softened
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • 1-¼ cups all-purpose flour
  • ¾ cup peanut butter chips
  • 1 cup crushed potato chips

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F

Have two ungreased cookie sheets ready

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place the light brown sugar, granulated sugar and softened butter.  Beat until smooth and creamy.  Add the egg and vanilla and beat to blend.  Mix in soda and then gradually add flour, beating just until all of the flour is incorporated.

By hand, stir in the peanut butter chips and potato chips – batter will be quite stiff.

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Using a rounded kitchen teaspoon, drop on ungreased sheets, 2 inches apart.

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Bake @ 350 degrees F for 8-10 minutes until golden brown.

Remove cookies immediately to a rack to cool.
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Makes about two dozen small cookies.  Do not refrigerate or freeze to keep potato chip crumbs crispy.

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One of my Christmas gifts this year was a small 4-½ x 6 inch leather bound book engraved “Cooking Recipes”, purchased at an antique mall in Sugar Creek, Ohio.  The pages are edged in gold and there are 10 index tabs for food categories.  

The real gold in this book, though, is the collection of handwritten recipes.  There aren’t a lot of recipes – just 25, 22 of which are desserts.  The book itself could have been from the 1930s, but I believe the recipes are from the 1945-1950 era.  This is based on a lot of recipes calling for shortening, for using the word “oleo” rather than margarine in most recipes and the attention given to oven temperatures.  I believe it’s post-World War II because of all of the sugar-laden desserts.

The handwriting is clear and ingredients are listed correctly, although most of the recipes give no idea of how the item is to be prepared, what kind of pan to use or how long to bake.  That’s why I’ve decided to make each of the recipes, using the products specified, and adding my own instructions.  I like to think that the woman from the 1940s kitchen (who would have been about my mother’s age) would enjoy having someone fuss around with these recipes again and turn out some delicious food for the family.

This recipe was marked by the author, “My own”.  It’s a very good cookie – lemony and chock-full of raisins – there are a lot of raisins in this cookie.  The outside is crispy and the inside soft.  I liked this cookie very much.

RAISIN COOKIES - A 1940s RECIPE

  • Servings: 36 small cookies
  • Print

  • ½ cup butter, softened
  • ¾ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 Tblsp. milk
  • 1 tsp. lemon juice
  • 1 tsp. grated lemon peel
  • 1-½ cups all-purpose flour
  • ¼ tsp. baking powder
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • 2 cups raisins

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F
Grease baking sheets

In large mixer bowl, place butter, sugar, egg, milk, lemon juice and lemon peel.  Beat at medium speed for 2 minutes.

In a separate bowl, mix together the flour, baking powder and salt.  Add gradually to the butter mixture, beating just enough to blend.

Stir in raisins by hand.


Drop by a level measuring tablespoon onto greased cookie sheets 2 inches apart.


Bake @ 375 degrees F for approximately 10 minutes.  Bottoms should be golden brown and tops light brown.  Remove to a rack to cool.

Makes 36 small cookies. 

Here is how I found the cute 1930s-40s era doll table and chairs.

https://lillianscupboard.wordpress.com/2012/09/22/look-what-i-just-found-at-the-antique-mall/


One of my Christmas gifts this year was a small 4-½ x 6 inch leather bound book engraved “Cooking Recipes”, purchased at an antique mall in Sugar Creek, Ohio.  The pages are edged in gold and there are 10 index tabs for food categories.  

The real gold in this book, though, is the collection of handwritten recipes.  There aren’t a lot of recipes – just 25, 22 of which are desserts.  The book itself could have been from the 1930s, but I believe the recipes are from the 1945-1950 era.  This is based on a lot of recipes calling for shortening, for using the word “oleo” rather than margarine in most recipes and the attention given to oven temperatures.  I believe it’s post-World War II because of all of the sugar-laden desserts.  

The handwriting is clear and ingredients are listed correctly, although most of the recipes give no idea of how the item is to be prepared, what kind of pan to use or how long to bake.  That’s why I’ve decided to make each of the recipes, using the products specified, and adding my own instructions.  I like to think that the woman from the 1940s kitchen (who would have been about my mother’s age) would enjoy having someone fuss around with these recipes again and turn out some delicious food for the family.

My version of the recipe is one-half of the original and I substituted dairy sour cream for the sour milk.  Like all of the recipes in this little book, the Brown Sugar Drops are easy and quick to make, homestyle, not too rich – just a good old-fashioned cookie.

BROWN SUGAR DROPS

  • Servings: Approx. 32 cookies
  • Print

  • ½ cup shortening
  • 1 cup light brown sugar
  • 1 egg
  • ¼ cup sour cream
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1-¾ cups all-purpose flour
  • Raisins or walnut halves (optional)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F
Lightly grease cookie sheets

Cream together the shortening, light brown sugar, egg and sour cream.  Mix in the soda and salt.  Gradually mix in the flour until well blended.

Drop cookies by a level measuring tablespoon onto the greased cookie sheets.

Place cookies 2 inches apart.

If desired, press a walnut half or 3 raisins into the tops of the cookies.

Bake @ 400 degrees F for 6 to 7 minutes until cookies are golden brown on the tops and bottoms.

Place on a wire rack to cool.

Yield:  Approximately 32 cookies 

A cup of tea from this pretty teapot would go well with the cookies.