Civil War Quilt-Block 7-Log Cabin

This is block #7 in the Civil War block-of-the-week series offered by Barbara Brackman.  It is called Log Cabin. Go to Barbara’s blog to get the pattern and to see the story and pictures related to this block.

http://civilwarquilts.blogspot.com/2011/02/7-log-cabin.html

I like to copy the pictures and directions, paste on a word document page and print for reference.

This is a simple block but does require accurate cutting/sewing and attention to placement of light and dark strips.  For new quilters, this is the way I assembled the block.

  • Cut the strips as directed on Barbara’s post.

Use 1/4 inch seams throughout.  Press toward the strip last sewn.

  • Sew dark strip E to right hand side of square F.  Piece should measure 4-1/2  x  3-1/8.
  • Sew dark strip D to the bottom of E/F.  Piece should measure 4-1/2  x 4-1/2.

  • Sew light strip D to the left-hand side of the piece.  Piece should measure 5-7/8 x 4-1/2.
  • Sew light strip B to top of piece.  Piece should measure 5-7/8 x 5-7/8.
  • Sew dark strip B to right-hand side of piece.  Piece should measure 7-1/8  x  5-7/8.

  • Sew dark strip C to bottom of piece.  Piece should measure 7-1/8 x 7-1/8.
  • Sew light strip C to left hand side of piece.  Piece should measure 8-1/2 x 7-1/8.
  • Sew light strip A to top of piece.  Piece should measure 8-1/2 x 8-1/2.
  • Press and trim.

See the previous blocks in this series in my category list on the right hand side of the page – Quilting – Civil War Quilts.

Civil War Quilt-Block 5-Kansas Troubles


This is block #5 in the Civil War block-of-the-week series offered by Barbara Brackman.  It is called Kansas Troubles.  Go to Barbara’s blog to get the pattern and to see the story and pictures related to this blog.

http://civilwarquilts.blogspot.com/

I like to copy the pictures and directions, paste on a word document page and print for reference.  I print on filler paper that can be inserted in a binder along with the finished block.

For new quilters, this is the way I assembled the block.  I hope your points turn out better than mine.

Update: In my original post I had given the wrong measurements for the finished section and the unfinished block.  The figures below are correct.

Use 1/4-inch seams throughout.

Cut the fabric according to directions.  Note: To avoid piecing very small triangles, for “C”, I cut 8 light and 8 dark pieces 2×2 inches square.

To assemble the “C” light/dark triangles:

Place one piece of dark and one piece of light 2-inch squares right sides together.  Draw a line across the center of the light square.

Draw a line 1/4 inch from the center line on both sides.

Place the piece on the sewing machine with the needle on the line to the left of the center line.  Stitch along this line and without breaking thread,

turn and stitch on the opposite line 1/4-inch from the center.

Cut on the center line to make two half-triangle squares,  Press to the dark fabric and lining up the 45 degree angle on the ruler, trim each block to 1-1/2 inches square.

Complete the remaining 7 pieces to give you a total of 16 half-triangle squares, 1-1/2 x 1-1/2 inches.

For the corner triangles “C”,  cut 4 dark pieces 1-7/8 x 1-7/8 inch square.  These pieces will be cut into 2 triangles each – a total of 8 dark triangles.

Normally, I would lay out all of the pieces of the block in the correct order, but to avoid confusion on this block, I lay out one section at a time.

Sew the two “C” squares along the left edge together.  Join those to the “D” block, aligning the bottom edges – there will be a 1/4 inch tip at the top.  Press toward “D” and trim the tip.

Sew light “B” to the two “C” squares along the bottom edge, being careful that the points are going in the right direction.  Press and trim tip.

Sew this section to the bottom of “D”

Sew the two corner “C” dark triangles to the piece.  Press and trim.

Sew this pieced triangle to “A”,  pressing toward “A”.

Press and trim.  This section should measure 4-1/2 x 4-1/2 inches.


Assemble remaining three sections in the same manner.

Lay sections on a mat in the correct order, referring to the picture from Barbara’s blog.

Join the two pieces in row 1, and then in row 2.  Join rows 1 and 2.

Press and trim to an 8-1/2 x 8-1/2 inch block (8-inch finished)

See the previous blocks in this series in my category list on the right hand side of the page – Quilting – Civil War Quilts.

Civil War Quilt – Block 2

North Star or Sawtooth Star

This is Block #2 in a block-of-the-week Civil War Quilt series offered by Barbara Brackman at Civil War Quilts.

Go to Barbara’s post to get the block picture and measurements for an 8-inch finished block.  For new quilters, this is how I assembled the block.

For this quilt, I chose to use as the center a picture of my oldest daughter in Civil War garb, taken in Gettysburg.

I scanned the picture, printed it on Inkjet Printable Fabric (Precious Treasures), then trimmed to 3-1/2 inches.  I used some neutral fabric to form a frame around the picture and to bring it to the correct 4-1/2 inch size.  Of course, any fabric you choose can be used as the center square.

Place the pieces on a mat, using the picture from the Civil War Quilts post as a guide.

Sew the center section of row 1, using 1/4-inch seams.

Press seam toward dark fabric.  Sew remaining triangle to center.

Press and trim.

Sew a 2-1/2 inch light block to either end of the center piece to complete row 1.

In row 2, complete the two side pieces as above.  Then, sew each completed piece to  a side of the center 4-1/2 inch square.

Complete the bottom row …

….and join the three rows.  Press and trim to an 8-1/2 inch block

Be sure to check out the very interesting story and photographs that Barbara includes with her free patterns.

Civil War Quilts

Note: I find it helpful to copy and paste the picture and measurements from the post and print it out for reference while I’m working.  When the block is completed, I place it along with the reference sheet in a plastic sleeve and file in a binder.

Vintage Handkerchief Holder

Last week I blogged about a Vintage Hankie Heart Pillow I made from the book, Hooked on Hankies by Laurene Sinema and Janet Carruth, Suzanne McNeill Design Originals. The post is here.

I have a lot of vintage handkerchiefs of varying sizes and I started thinking how I could use the idea of a pocket along with a holder that could be hung on the wall and that was easy to adapt to different dimensions.

I have a nice collection of children’s scottie  handkerchiefs which are much smaller than the standard.  This is the formula I worked out:

Formula:

  • Front – Fabric A – Side measurement of hankie folded in fourths plus 1″
  • Pocket – Fabric B – Same measurement as Fabric A
  • Backing – Fabric C – Same measurement as Fabric A plus 2 inches extra
  • Batting – Same measurement as Fabric A plus 2 inches extra
  • Binding – One side measurement of A x 4 plus 3″ extra

I started out by folding the hankie in fourths and measuring along one side.  In this example, it was 5-1/2″.  I added 1″ to this measurement to equal 6-1/2″

For this dimension I used:

  • Fabric A for the front of the holder – 6-1/2″ square
  • Fabric B for the pocket – 6-1/2″ square
  • Fabric C for backing – 8-1/2″ square (6-1/2″ plus 2″ extra)
  • Batting same size as backing – 8-1/2″ square
  • Binding 1-1/2″wide x 29″ long (4 sides @ 6-1/2″ = 26 plus 3″ extra)

Cut  6-1/2″ square from Fabric A – set aside

Cut 6-1/2″ square from Fabric B and fold in half, wrong sides together.  Press.  Top stitch 1/4″ from folded edge.  Set aside.

Cut 8-1/2″ square from backing fabric and place right side down on worktable.  Place 8-1/2″ square of batting on top of backing.  Center 6-1/2″ square of Fabric A on top of the batting.  Pin in place.

Quilt by sewing straight lines, beginning at the center,  from corner to corner and from each mid-section across the piece.  Decorative stitching would be nice here.

Trim away excess batting and backing.

Place the pocket Fabric B on the lower half of the front Fabric A, matching the bottom point.  Pin and then baste 1/8″ from the two raw edges.

Press 1/2 inch from one end of binding.   Place binding right side down on the right side of the front with the pressed section facing up.  Sew 1/4″ seam to attach the binding and overlap at the end to cover the folded portion.

Trim off any excess binding.  Press and hand-stitch the folded section.  Turn binding to wrong side, allowing 1/4″ to show on the front, fold under binding and hand-stitch to the back.

As a hanger, attach a  ribbon, ring or maybe a vintage belt buckle if you have one.  I like to use drapery clips on my wall hangings.

Embellish any way you like.  I’m partial to vintage buttons.

Fold the handkerchief and tuck it into the pocket – no damage to the hankie itself and easy to change out.

I made another holder for a smaller handkerchief, using the formula …

…and for this standard-size hankie.  I folded it a little differently so more of the floral design would show.

It’s a fun, fast project, uses up scraps, and offers a chance to display some of those treasured handkerchiefs we all have tucked away in a drawer somewhere.