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Tag Archives: whole wheat

oatmeal-top

This recipe came from a favorite source in the 1980s – The Blue Ribbon Gazette, a newsletter with recipes from blue ribbon winners from all over the country.  I won a blue ribbon with this bread at the large Harvest Home Festival (Cincinnati) in 1989.

This is a hearty bread that stays soft for several days and is wonderful toasted or used for a grilled sandwich.

HONEY OATMEAL BREAD

  • Servings: Three 7-1/2 inch loaves or two 9-inch loaves
  • Print

1-½ cups milk
1 cup oats, quick
1 Tblsp. salt
2 Tblsp. canola oil
One 13 oz. can evaporated milk, undiluted
¼ cup honey
2 Tblsp. fast acting yeast*
2 cups whole wheat flour
3-4 cups all-purpose flour

**I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast. I buy it in bulk (454 g) and the package says that it is made in Canada. I understand it is packaged under the name “Instant Dry” for distribution through stores like Sam’s, “Rapid Rise” in the U.S. and “Quick Rise” in Canada. The “Instant Dry”, “Rapid Rise” or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot liquid.

Grease three 7-½ inch or two 9-inch loaf pans

Place 1-½ cups of milk in a pan, bring to a boil.  Add oats and salt and cook for 2 minutes.  Add oil, evaporated milk, honey and salt.  Cool to 130 degrees F. (cooling will take 10-15 minutes).

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place yeast and 2 cups whole wheat flour.  Beat to blend flour and yeast.  Add 130 degree F milk/honey mixture and beat with paddle beater for 3 minutes on medium speed.

Remove paddle beater and insert dough hook.  Continue to beat for 6-1/2 minutes, adding all-purpose flour a little at a time.   You may not have to use all of the flour – the dough should be smooth and elastic after 6-1/2 minutes. Although a little sticky because of the honey.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn dough over once and cover with a napkin or tea towel.  Let rise for 45 minutes in a warm place that is free of drafts (I put mine on top of my microwave which sets under a cabinet).

After 45 minutes, punch down dough (press your knuckles into the dough to deflate it). Remove dough to a lightly floured board and divide into three portions for 7-½ inch loaves or into two portions for 9 inch loaves.  Roll each portion into a loaf, pinch seams to seal and place seam-side-down in a greased 7-½ inch or 9-inch loaf pan.  Cover and let rise for another 45 minutes.

Preheat oven to  350 degrees F.

Bake 7-½ inch loaves for approximately 30-35 minutes and the 9 inch loaves for about 50-60 minutes or until bread is golden brown and has a hollow sound when tapped (200 degrees on a bread thermometer*).

Cover with a piece of foil if top is browning too fast.  Remove bread from pans immediately, cover with a napkin or a tea towel and let cool on a wire rack.

Yield:  Three 7-½ inch loaves or two 9 inch loaves

oatmeal-sl

 


sesame-top

I like to have toasted homemade bread for breakfast and like to try different combinations of ingredients.  I put together this recipe which incorporates whole wheat flour plus honey and sesame seeds.  This bread has a nice flavor and a little bit of crunch from the sesame seeds.

SESAME HONEY BREAD

  • Servings: Two 9-inch loaves or three 7-¾ inch loaves or two 7-¾ inch loaves plus six large rolls
  • Print

  • 2 Tblsp. fast acting dry yeast*
  • 2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 Tblsp. salt
  • ½ cup sesame seeds
  • 2-¼ cups milk
  • 1/3 cup oil (canola)
  • ½ cup honey
  • 2-½ to 3 cups all-purpose flour

*I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast. I buy it in bulk (454 g) and the package says that it is made in Canada. I understand it is packaged under the name “Instant Dry” for distribution through stores like Sam’s, “Rapid Rise” in the U.S. and “Quick Rise” in Canada. The “Instant Dry”, “Rapid Rise” or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place yeast, 2 cups whole wheat flour, salt and sesame seeds.  Beat to blend dry ingredients.

Heat milk, oil and honey to 130 degrees F.

sesame-liq

Add heated ingredients to dry mixture in bowl.  With paddle beater, mix on medium speed for 3 minutes.

Remove paddle beater and insert dough hook.  Continue to beat for 6-1/2 minutes, adding flour a little at a time.   You may not have to use all of the flour – the dough should be smooth and elastic after 6-1/2 minutes.  It may be a bit sticky because of the honey.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn dough over once and cover with a napkin or tea towel.  Let rise for 45 minutes in a warm place that is free of drafts (I put mine on top of my microwave which sets under a cabinet).
sesame-rise

After 45 minutes, punch down dough (press your knuckles into the dough to deflate it) and lay it on a lightly floured surface.  Roll the dough and form into loaves and/or rolls.  Turn over and pinch the edges to seal.  Place loaves/rolls in greased loaf pan or baking pan. Cover and let rise for another 30 minutes.
sesame-pans

Preheat oven to  350 degrees F.

Bake 9-inch loaves for approximately 45 minutes, 7-¾ inch loaves for about 35 minutes and rolls for about 20 minutes until bread is golden brown and has a hollow sound when tapped on the bottom or to 205-210 degrees on a bread thermometer.  Cover with a piece of foil if top is browning too fast.  Remove bread from pan immediately, cover with a napkin or a tea towel and let cool on a wire rack.

sesame--rack

Yield:  Two 9-inch loaves or three 7-¾ inch loaves or two 7-¾ inch loaves plus six large rolls. 

sesame-bot


crwh-top

I first made this bread in 1995, adapted from a recipe in a cookbook called America’s Best.  I have a note in my binder:  “Good flavor – chewy”.

This makes a hearty bread that is chewy due to the cracked wheat (bulgur).  It’s really delicious toasted and makes a very filling breakfast with a cup of coffee or tea.

CRACKED WHEAT YEAST BREAD

  • Servings: Two nine-inch or three 7-½ inch loaves
  • Print

  • 1 cup cracked wheat (bulgur)
  • 3-1/4 cups water
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 3 T butter
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 2 cups whole-wheat flour
  • 2 Tblps. fast acting yeast*
  • 4to 4-1/2 cups all-purpose flour

*I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast. I buy it in bulk (454 g) and the package says that it is made in Canada. I understand it is packaged under the name “Instant Dry” for distribution through stores like Sam’s, “Rapid Rise” in the U.S. and “Quick Rise” in Canada. The “Instant Dry”, “Rapid Rise” or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.

crwh-bulgur

Combine cracked wheat and water in medium pan.  Bring to boil, then remove from heat.  Add honey, butter and salt.  Cool to 130 degrees F (this will take about 20 minutes to cool).

Combine whole-wheat flour and yeast in large mixing bowl.  Add cracked-wheat mixture and with the paddle beater, beat @ low speed for 30 seconds and for 3 minutes @ medium speed.  Insert dough hook and knead for 6-1/2 minutes, adding all-purpose flour as necessary until dough is elastic.  Dough may feel a bit sticky because of the honey.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn dough over once and cover with a napkin or tea towel.  Let rise for 30 minutes in a warm place that is free of drafts (I put mine on top of my microwave which sets under a cabinet).

After 30 minutes, punch down dough (press your knuckles into the dough to deflate it) and lay it on a lightly floured surface.  Divide the dough into two portions …

crwh-1

…and roll each portion to form into a loaf.  Turn over and pinch the edges to seal.  Place loaves in greased 9-inch loaf pans –  cover and let rise for another 30 minutes.
crwh-2

Preheat oven to  350  degrees F.  Bake for 40-60 minutes until bread is golden brown and has a hollow sound when tapped on the bottom.  Cover with a piece of foil if top is browning too fast.  Remove bread from pan immediately…

crwh-3

…cover with a napkin or a tea towel and let cool on a wire rack.

Yield:  Two nine-inch or three 7-½ inch loaves

crwh-bot


This recipe is based on one from a wonderful book, Cooking from Quilt Country by Marcia Adams. Wholesome ingredients like whole wheat flour and buttermilk go into an easy mixture that bakes into crunchy cereal.

HOMEMADE GRAHAM NUTS

  • 3-1/2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 cups buttermilk
  • 2 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a large bowl, combine flour, brown sugar, salt, baking soda and cinnamon.  Add the buttermilk and vanilla, mixing well.

Pour out into an oiled 10-1/2×15-1/2″ flat baking pan and spread evenly.  Dampening your palms with water is an easy way to get the dough spread out evenly.

Bake for 20 to 25 minutes until the batter is firm, medium-brown in color and shrinks slightly from the sides of the pan.  Loosen from the pan and allow to cool on a rack for several hours or overnight.

Preheat oven to 275 degrees F.  Break up the pieces of cereal and pulse in a food processor until coarse crumbs are formed.  Divide the crumbs between two 10-1/2×15-1/2″ jellyroll pans that are lined with parchment paper.  Bake for 45 minutes to an hour, depending on degree of crispness you like.  An hour made the cereal just right for my taste and so it didn’t get soggy in milk.

Let cool, then store in an airtight container.  Since there are no preservatives in the cereal, I would suggest refrigerating or freezing the cereal if you don’t plan to use it within two weeks or so.

Serve as a cold cereal with milk and a bit of brown sugar if desired (I didn’t think it needed additional sugar).  A few raisins and/or walnuts are a nice addition.

Note:  The original recipe called for baking in a 12×16″ flat pan.  I didn’t have that size and added some time to the baking to compensate and also to get the degree of crispness I wanted.

Yield:  Approximately 11 cups of cereal.

This beautiful book, Cooking from Quilt Country, published in 1989, not only has great homemade Amish/Mennonite-inspired recipes but loads of color pictures and information on the Amish and Mennonite people and their culture.  I found my copy in an antique shop, but I notice the book is also available, new and used, at Amazon and on eBay.


Every Wednesday, granddaughter Dolphin comes to my house and most of the time we make bread.  This week we made an old favorite going back over more than 20 years – Honey Whole Wheat Bread.

HONEY WHOLE WHEAT BREAD & ROLLS

  • Servings: One 9-inch loaf or one 7-1/2-inch loaf plus 12 rolls
  • Print

  • 2 packages fast rising dry yeast
  • 2 cups of whole wheat flour (Gold Medal)
  • 1/2 cup instant potato flakes
  • 1/2 cup non-fat dry milk
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 2 cups of water heated to 130 degrees F
  • 3 Tblsp. oil
  • 3 Tblsp. honey
  • 3-4 cups all-purpose flour (Gold Medal)

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place yeast, whole wheat flour, instant potato flakes, dry milk and salt.  Stir to blend.  Add heated water, oil and honey.  With paddle beater, beat at medium speed for 3 minutes.  Insert dough hook and continue beating for another 6:30 minutes, adding all-purpose flour as required to make dough springy and not sticky.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes.  Punch down, form into loaves and/or rolls, place formed dough on oiled pans, cover and let rise for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Bake loaves, according to size, for 25 to 45 minutes until golden brown on top and loaves sound hollow when tapped.  Bake rolls for 12-15 minutes, according to size.  I like to bake one loaf of bread in a medium size 7-1/2″ pan for 25 minutes and form 12 rolls from the remaining dough to bake on a large cookie sheet for 12 minutes.

Dolphin and I enjoy a roll fresh from the oven with butter and a drizzle of honey.

Back when I first started making Honey Whole Wheat Bread, my aunt and then later my mother were fighting cancer and nothing tasted good to them but this bread.  I made each one a loaf every week until even this fresh bread didn’t taste good to them any more.   My aunt passed away in 1989 and my mother in 1991.  I know they would be happy to think that Dolphin is enjoying the bread now.