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Tag Archives: Yeast Bread

brdstk-top
I started making these breadsticks in 1992, adapted from a recipe in my favorite bread cookbook, Clayton’s Book of Breads.  Be sure to use a good sharp, full-flavored cheese.

Italian Cheese Breadsticks

  • Servings: One to two dozen, depending on size
  • Print

2 Tblsp. Fast acting yeast
2 tsp salt
2 Tblsp. granulated sugar
4-1/2 cups all-purpose flour, divided
1-1/2 cups water, heated to 130 degrees F
¼ cup canola oil
1-1/2 cups good flavored cheese, grated

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place yeast, salt, sugar and 2 cups of flour.

Heat water to 130 degrees F, add cheese and stir to melt, reheat mixture to 130 degrees F.

Pour water/cheese mixture into bowl with flour mixture, add oil.  Beat on medium speed with a paddle beater for 3 minutes.  Remove the paddle beater and insert a dough hook.  Continue to beat at medium speed, adding flour gradually for 6-½ minutes.  You may not need all of the flour.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes.

Punch down dough and using ¼ cup of dough, form into a cigar-shaped roll 5 inches long.  Place on a greased baking pan 3 inches apart.  Cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Bake breadsticks for approximately 12 minutes until they are golden brown.  Remove to a rack to cool.

brdstk-rack2

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oatmeal-top

This recipe came from a favorite source in the 1980s – The Blue Ribbon Gazette, a newsletter with recipes from blue ribbon winners from all over the country.  I won a blue ribbon with this bread at the large Harvest Home Festival (Cincinnati) in 1989.

This is a hearty bread that stays soft for several days and is wonderful toasted or used for a grilled sandwich.

HONEY OATMEAL BREAD

  • Servings: Three 7-1/2 inch loaves or two 9-inch loaves
  • Print

1-½ cups milk
1 cup oats, quick
1 Tblsp. salt
2 Tblsp. canola oil
One 13 oz. can evaporated milk, undiluted
¼ cup honey
2 Tblsp. fast acting yeast*
2 cups whole wheat flour
3-4 cups all-purpose flour

**I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast. I buy it in bulk (454 g) and the package says that it is made in Canada. I understand it is packaged under the name “Instant Dry” for distribution through stores like Sam’s, “Rapid Rise” in the U.S. and “Quick Rise” in Canada. The “Instant Dry”, “Rapid Rise” or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot liquid.

Grease three 7-½ inch or two 9-inch loaf pans

Place 1-½ cups of milk in a pan, bring to a boil.  Add oats and salt and cook for 2 minutes.  Add oil, evaporated milk, honey and salt.  Cool to 130 degrees F. (cooling will take 10-15 minutes).

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place yeast and 2 cups whole wheat flour.  Beat to blend flour and yeast.  Add 130 degree F milk/honey mixture and beat with paddle beater for 3 minutes on medium speed.

Remove paddle beater and insert dough hook.  Continue to beat for 6-1/2 minutes, adding all-purpose flour a little at a time.   You may not have to use all of the flour – the dough should be smooth and elastic after 6-1/2 minutes. Although a little sticky because of the honey.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn dough over once and cover with a napkin or tea towel.  Let rise for 45 minutes in a warm place that is free of drafts (I put mine on top of my microwave which sets under a cabinet).

After 45 minutes, punch down dough (press your knuckles into the dough to deflate it). Remove dough to a lightly floured board and divide into three portions for 7-½ inch loaves or into two portions for 9 inch loaves.  Roll each portion into a loaf, pinch seams to seal and place seam-side-down in a greased 7-½ inch or 9-inch loaf pan.  Cover and let rise for another 45 minutes.

Preheat oven to  350 degrees F.

Bake 7-½ inch loaves for approximately 30-35 minutes and the 9 inch loaves for about 50-60 minutes or until bread is golden brown and has a hollow sound when tapped (200 degrees on a bread thermometer*).

Cover with a piece of foil if top is browning too fast.  Remove bread from pans immediately, cover with a napkin or a tea towel and let cool on a wire rack.

Yield:  Three 7-½ inch loaves or two 9 inch loaves

oatmeal-sl

 


mincebr-bot

This recipe is adapted from one in a favorite cookbook which I received from my son and daughter-in-law in the 1980s – Elsah’s Landing Heartland Cooking (Illinois).

I thought the reconstituted mincemeat was sweet enough to allow me to reduce the sugar.  The result is a soft, easy-to-handle dough and a loaf with interesting flavors from the orange peel and mincemeat.  It’s wonderful toasted and we also like it as a buttered, grilled sandwich with our favorite chicken salad.

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APPLE MINCEMEAT YEAST BREAD

  • Servings: Two 9-inch or three 7-1/2-inch loaves
  • Print

2 Tblsp. fast acting dry yeast*
¼ cup granulated sugar
1 Tblsp grated orange peel
1-½ tsp salt
1 cup water
½ cup apple juice
½ cup unsweetened applesauce
¼ cup canola oil
½ cup mincemeat (reconstituted)**
5-½ to 6 cups all-purpose flour, divided

*I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast. I buy it in bulk (454 g) and the package says that it is made in Canada. I understand it is packaged under the name “Instant Dry” for distribution through stores like Sam’s, “Rapid Rise” in the U.S. and “Quick Rise” in Canada. The “Instant Dry”, “Rapid Rise” or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.

**This mincemeat comes in a 9 oz. block which is cooked with boiling water to make 1-½ cups of mincemeat comparable to the mincemeat that is prepared and sold in a jar.  Use just ½ cup for this recipe.

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place 2 cups all-purpose flour, yeast, sugar, orange peel, and salt.  Beat to blend dry ingredients.

Heat water, apple juice, applesauce and canola oil to 130 degrees F.  Add heated ingredients to dry mixture in bowl.  With paddle beater, mix on medium speed for 3 minutes.

Add mincemeat and beat for 30 seconds.

Remove paddle beater and insert dough hook.  Continue to beat for 6-1/2 minutes, adding flour a little at a time.   You may not have to use all of the flour – the dough should be smooth and elastic after 6-1/2 minutes.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn dough over once and cover with a napkin or tea towel.  Let rise for 45 minutes in a warm place that is free of drafts (I put mine on top of my microwave which sets under a cabinet).

After 45 minutes, punch down dough (press your knuckles into the dough to deflate it) and lay it on a lightly floured surface.  Roll the dough and form into two 9-inch or three 7-½ inch loaves. loaf.  Turn over and pinch the edges to seal.  Place loaves in greased loaf pans.  Cover and let rise for another 45 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Bake loaves 45-50 minutes for 9-inch loaves and 35-45 minutes 7-½ inch loaves until bread is golden brown and has a hollow sound when tapped or registers 210 degrees on a bread thermometer.  Cover with a piece of foil if top is browning too fast.

Remove bread from pan immediately, cover with a napkin or a tea towel and let cool on a wire rack.

mincebr-sliced

 


muff-top

I first made this bread in 1995 from a magazine clipping.  In my binder, I had it marked “excellent”.  Note that there is no oil or butter in the bread, that it requires no hand-kneading and that it only needs one rising.  This is an easy, fast bread to make and gives good results.  Bread is delicious fresh from the oven with butter or toasted in the morning for a quick, tasty breakfast.

NO-KNEAD ENGLISH MUFFIN LOAF

  • Servings: One 9-inch loaf and rolls (number depends on size) OR two 7-½ inch loaves plus one mini-loaf
  • Print

2 Tblsp. fast acting dry yeast*
6 cups all-purpose flour, divided
¼ tsp baking soda
2 Tblsp. granulated sugar
2 tsp salt
½ cup water
2 cups milk
Cornmeal for sprinkling in pans

*I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast. I buy it in bulk (454 g) and the package says that it is made in Canada. I understand it is packaged under the name “Instant Dry” for distribution through stores like Sam’s, “Rapid Rise” in the U.S. and “Quick Rise” in Canada. The “Instant Dry”, “Rapid Rise” or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.

Grease one 9-inch loaf pan and a pie tin for rolls OR two 7-½ inch loaf pans and one mini-loaf pan.  Place a teaspoon of cornmeal in each pan and tip/swirl to have cornmeal cover bottom and sides of pans.

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place yeast, 2 cups all-purpose flour, soda, sugar and salt.  Beat to blend dry ingredients.

Heat water and milk to 130 degrees F.
muff-milk

Add heated ingredients to dry mixture in bowl.  With paddle beater, mix on medium speed for 3 minutes.

Remove paddle beater and insert dough hook.  Continue to beat for 6-1/2 minutes, adding 4 cups of flour a little at a time.  Dough will be very stiff and sticky.

muff-batter

Divide dough among the pans to form very craggy, rustic loaves.  Cover with a tea towel and  let rise for 30 minutes in a warm place that is free of drafts (I put mine on top of my microwave which sets under a cabinet).

muff-pans

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.  Bake loaves for approximately 20 minutes for the mini-loaf, 15 minutes for rolls, 30 minutes for the 7-½ inch loaves and 45 minutes for the 9-inch loaves or until bread is golden brown and has a hollow sound when tapped on the bottom – 190 degrees on a bread thermometer.

muff-therm

Cover with a piece of foil if top is browning too fast.  Remove bread from pans immediately, cover with a napkin or a tea towel and let cool on a wire rack.

Yield:  One 9-inch loaf and rolls (number depends on size) OR two 7-½ inch loaves plus one mini-loaf 

muff-bot


Bonanza-baked2

I bought some self-rising flour for a special recipe and was looking for a way to use the rest of it since I prefer all-purpose flour for my baking. In checking the internet, I saw it wasn’t generally recommended to use self-rising flour in yeast bread but then found an old recipe of mine from 9 years ago that used baking powder in yeast bread. I thought maybe the self-rising flour would work here and it did. The bread has a different texture from my usual bread and is soft with a crispy crust. I particularly enjoy the crunch of the sunflower seeds and the slight grittiness of the corn meal.

BONANZA BREAD

  • Servings: One 9-inch loaf
  • Print

  • 3 cups (approx.) of self-rising flour, divided
  • 1/4 cup yellow corn meal
  • 1 Tblsp. fast rising yeast *
  • ¾ cup water
  • 3 Tblsp. canola oil
  • 3 Tblsp. honey
  • 1 egg plus one egg yolk – reserve white of one egg (room temperature)
  • Reserved egg white mixed with 1/2 tsp. water
  • 1-1/2 Tblsp. sunflower seeds

*I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast. I buy it in bulk (454 g) and the package says that it is made in Canada. I understand it is packaged under the name “Instant Dry” for distribution through stores like Sam’s, “Rapid Rise” in the U.S. and “Quick Rise” in Canada. The “Instant Dry”, “Rapid Rise” or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.

One 9-inch loaf pan, greased

In large bowl of electric mixer, combine 1-1/2 cups flour, corn meal, yeast, baking powder and salt. Mix to blend.

In a 2-cup measure, place water, oil and honey. Heat to 130 degrees F. Add the honey mixture to the dry ingredients. Using a paddle beater, beat on medium speed for 2-1/2 minutes. Add egg and egg yolk (room temperature) and beat for another 30 seconds.

Bonanza-eggs

Insert dough hooks and beat for an additional 6-1/2 minutes, adding flour as necessary to knead the dough until it is smooth and elastic. It will feel a bit sticky because of the honey.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn dough over once and cover with a napkin or tea towel. Let rise for 45 minutes in a warm place that is free of drafts (I put mine on top of my microwave which sets under a cabinet).

Bonanza-rise

After 45 minutes, punch down dough (press your knuckles into the dough to deflate it) and lay it on a lightly floured surface. Roll the dough and form into a loaf. Turn over and pinch the edges to seal.

Brush top of loaf with egg white mixture …

Bonanza-white

and invert loaf onto a large pan covered with sunflower seeds.

Bonanza-seeds

Press to make seeds stick to dough.

Bonanza-ready

Place bread seed-side-up in greased 9-inch pan. Cover and let rise for another 45 minutes.

Bonanza-inpan

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Bake loaf for approximately 40 to 45 minutes until bread is golden brown and has a hollow sound when tapped (200 degrees F on bread thermometer). Cover with a piece of foil if top is browning too fast. Remove bread from pan immediately and let cool on a wire rack.

Yield: One 9-inch loaf 

Bonanza-knife
One of my Christmas gifts this past year was a wonderful bread knife with a serrated blade and a wooden guide to help cut ½ inch to 5/8 inch slices.

fromN-breadknife

My daughter found my knife in an antique store but they have a web site here http://www.mountainwoods.com/category.cfm/Category/43.htm. I also saw some listings on eBay. I love this knife for slicing bread. The trick is to allow a tiny bit of space between the bread and the wooden guide. I read that it’s best to store the knife with the blades facing down and found the perfect spot on my vintage ladle rack.

muff-knife


goodrye-top

This is a quick and easy bread to make with dough hooks and fast rising yeast.  It comes out of the oven a medium brown color with the sharp flavor of the caraway seeds.  It’s excellent for grilled cheese, Reubens or other grilled sandwiches and I especially like it toasted for breakfast.

GOOD AND EASY RYE BREAD WITH CARAWAY SEED

  • Servings: Three 7-1/2-inch loaves or two 9-inch loaves
  • Print

*  5-½ to 6 cups all-purpose flour, divided
*  1 cup rye flour
*  2 Tblsp. fast-rising yeast*
*  3/4 cup non-fat dry milk
*  2 tsp. salt
*  ¼ cup dark brown sugar
*  ¼ cup cocoa
*  3 Tblsp. caraway seed
*  3 Tblsp canola oil
*  2-1/4 cups water heated to 130 degrees F

*I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast. I buy it in bulk (454 g) and the package says that it is made in Canada. I understand it is packaged under the name “Instant Dry” for distribution through stores like Sam’s, but is identical to “Quick Rise” in Canada.  The “Instant“ or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.  Rising time is cut in half.

Grease three 7-½ inch or two 9 inch loaf pans

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place 1 cup of all-purpose flour, 1 cup of rye flour, yeast, dry milk, salt, brown sugar, cocoa and caraway seed.  Mix to blend and add oil and 130 degree F water.  Beat on medium speed with regular beater for 3 minutes.  Insert dough hook and beat another 6:30 minutes, adding flour as needed to make dough elastic and not sticky.

Place dough in oiled bowl, cover and let rise in warm place for 45 minutes.

goodrye-rise

Punch down dough and form into loaves.  I like to divide the dough in thirds and place a third in each of three loaf pans which measure 7-1/2 x 3-3/4 x 2-1/4 inches.  Bread could also be divided in two and formed into two 9-inch loaves.

goodrye-3pans

Cover the bread and let rise 45 minutes.  Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Bake the 7-½ inch loaves for approximately 30 minutes and the 9 inch loaves for approximately 45 minutes until bread is golden brown and sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom (200 to 205 degrees on a bread thermometer).

Cover and let cool on a wire rack.

goodrye-baked

Yield:  Three 7-½ inch or two 9 inch loaves

goodrye-bot


sesame-top

I like to have toasted homemade bread for breakfast and like to try different combinations of ingredients.  I put together this recipe which incorporates whole wheat flour plus honey and sesame seeds.  This bread has a nice flavor and a little bit of crunch from the sesame seeds.

SESAME HONEY BREAD

  • Servings: Two 9-inch loaves or three 7-¾ inch loaves or two 7-¾ inch loaves plus six large rolls
  • Print

  • 2 Tblsp. fast acting dry yeast*
  • 2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 Tblsp. salt
  • ½ cup sesame seeds
  • 2-¼ cups milk
  • 1/3 cup oil (canola)
  • ½ cup honey
  • 2-½ to 3 cups all-purpose flour

*I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast. I buy it in bulk (454 g) and the package says that it is made in Canada. I understand it is packaged under the name “Instant Dry” for distribution through stores like Sam’s, “Rapid Rise” in the U.S. and “Quick Rise” in Canada. The “Instant Dry”, “Rapid Rise” or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place yeast, 2 cups whole wheat flour, salt and sesame seeds.  Beat to blend dry ingredients.

Heat milk, oil and honey to 130 degrees F.

sesame-liq

Add heated ingredients to dry mixture in bowl.  With paddle beater, mix on medium speed for 3 minutes.

Remove paddle beater and insert dough hook.  Continue to beat for 6-1/2 minutes, adding flour a little at a time.   You may not have to use all of the flour – the dough should be smooth and elastic after 6-1/2 minutes.  It may be a bit sticky because of the honey.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn dough over once and cover with a napkin or tea towel.  Let rise for 45 minutes in a warm place that is free of drafts (I put mine on top of my microwave which sets under a cabinet).
sesame-rise

After 45 minutes, punch down dough (press your knuckles into the dough to deflate it) and lay it on a lightly floured surface.  Roll the dough and form into loaves and/or rolls.  Turn over and pinch the edges to seal.  Place loaves/rolls in greased loaf pan or baking pan. Cover and let rise for another 30 minutes.
sesame-pans

Preheat oven to  350 degrees F.

Bake 9-inch loaves for approximately 45 minutes, 7-¾ inch loaves for about 35 minutes and rolls for about 20 minutes until bread is golden brown and has a hollow sound when tapped on the bottom or to 205-210 degrees on a bread thermometer.  Cover with a piece of foil if top is browning too fast.  Remove bread from pan immediately, cover with a napkin or a tea towel and let cool on a wire rack.

sesame--rack

Yield:  Two 9-inch loaves or three 7-¾ inch loaves or two 7-¾ inch loaves plus six large rolls. 

sesame-bot