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Tag Archives: Yeast Bread

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Whenever I make my favorite macaroni and cheese, I buy an 8 oz. package of cottage cheese and have a cup left over.  I combined portions of several recipes online to use up the cottage cheese and make some really good yeast rolls.  These are very quick to put together if you have a mixer with dough hooks and fast-acting yeast.

I divided the dough into 8 pieces for large rolls, but they could also be made into 12 medium rolls.  Adjust the baking time to about 12 minutes for the medium rolls.

QUICK COTTAGE CHEESE YEAST ROLLS

  • Servings: 8 large rolls or 12 medium rolls
  • Print

  • 1 cup cottage cheese
  • ¼ cup water
  • 1 Tblsp. butter
  • Approx.  3 cups all-purpose flour, divided
  • 1 Tblsp. fast acting yeast*
  • 2 Tblsp. granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • ¼ tsp. baking soda
  • 1 egg

*I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast. I buy it in bulk (454 g) and the package says that it is made in Canada. I understand it is packaged under the name “Instant Dry” for distribution through stores like Sam’s, “Rapid Rise” in the U.S. and “Quick Rise” in Canada. The “Instant Dry”, “Rapid Rise” or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.

Place cottage cheese, water and butter in a small bowl and microwave for approximately 1-½ minutes to a temperature of 130 degrees F.  Set aside.

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In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place 1 cup all-purpose flour, yeast, sugar, salt and baking soda.  Beat to blend dry ingredients.  Add 130 degree F cottage cheese mixture and with paddle beater, mix on medium speed for 3 minutes.  Add egg and beat for 30 seconds.

Remove paddle beater and insert dough hook.  Continue to beat for 6-1/2 minutes, adding flour a little at a time.   You may not have to use all of the flour – the dough should be smooth and elastic after 6-1/2 minutes.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn dough over once and cover with a napkin or tea towel.  Let rise for 30 minutes in a warm place that is free of drafts (I put mine on top of my microwave which sets under a cabinet).

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After 30 minutes, punch down dough (press your knuckles into the dough to deflate it) and lay it on a lightly floured surface.

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Knead a couple of times and divide dough into 8 pieces.  Form a roll with your hands from each piece and place on a greased baking sheet.

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Cover and let rise for another 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Bake rolls for approximately 15 minutes (for 8 rolls) or 12 minutes (for 12 rolls) until tops are golden brown (200 degrees on a bread thermometer).

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Remove rolls to a wire rack and cover with a napkin or tea towel to cool.

Yield:  8 large rolls or 12 medium rolls

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Since today, October 16, is World Bread Day, I tried a new recipe that was adapted from one in a cookbook called Elsah Landing Heartland Cooking (Illinois), a gift from my youngest son and his wife. The basic changes were to adapt to an easier way to mix the dough with fast-acting yeast and dough hooks.

This makes a delicious soft bread with just a whisper of onion and sage plus a slight texture of corn meal.  Makes great toast or grilled cheese and/or meat sandwiches.

ONION AND SAGE YEAST CORNBREAD

  • Servings: Two 9-inch or three 7-½-inch loaves
  • Print

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  • 6 to 6-½ cups all-purpose flour, divided
  • 1 cup yellow corn meal
  • 2 Tblsp. fast acting yeast*
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 Tblsp. salt
  • ½ tsp rubbed dry sage
  • ¼ cup dry onion flakes
  • 1-¼ cups water
  • 1 cup undiluted evaporated milk
  • 1/3 cup canola oil
  • 2 eggs, well beaten (room temperature)

*I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast. I buy it in bulk (454 g) and the package says that it is made in Canada. I understand it is packaged under the name “Instant Dry” for distribution through stores like Sam’s, “Rapid Rise” in the U.S. and “Quick Rise” in Canada. The “Instant Dry”, “Rapid Rise” or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place 2 cups all-purpose flour, corn meal, yeast, sugar, salt, dry sage and dry onion flakes.  Beat to blend dry ingredients.

Heat water and evaporated milk to 130 degrees F.  Add heated ingredients to dry mixture in bowl along with oil.  With paddle beater, mix on medium speed for 3 minutes.

Add eggs and beat for 30 seconds.

Remove paddle beater and insert dough hook.  Continue to beat for 6-1/2 minutes, adding flour a little at a time.   You may not have to use all of the flour – the dough should be smooth and elastic after 6-1/2 minutes.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn dough over once and cover with a napkin or tea towel.  Let rise for 30 minutes in a warm place that is free of drafts (I put mine on top of my microwave which sets under a cabinet).

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After 30 minutes, punch down dough (press your knuckles into the dough to deflate it) and lay it on a lightly floured surface.  Divide dough into two portions (for 9 inch loaves) or three portions (for 7-½ inch loaves).  Roll the dough and form into a loaf.  Turn over and pinch the edges to seal.  Place loaves in greased loaf pans, cover and let rise for another 30 minutes..

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Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Bake loaves approximately 45-50 minutes for 9 inch loaves (200 degrees on bread thermometer) or 30-35 minutes for 7-½ inch loaves (200 degrees on bread thermometer) or until bread is golden brown and has a hollow sound when tapped on the bottom.  Cover with a piece of foil if top is browning too fast.  Remove bread from pans immediately, cover with a napkin or a tea towel and let cool on a wire rack.

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Yield:  Two 9-inch or three 7-½-inch loaves.

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A buttered slice or two is just right to accompany a bowl of soup or chili.

Sweet Potato and Bean Soup
White Chicken Chili
Depression Vegetable Soup
Potato Soup


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In the 1980s, I started using Saco Buttermilk Powder to make bread and sent away for a collection of recipe cards.  It was a wonderful set of cards and this was one of my early favorites.  I first made the bread in 1986 and rated it “excellent”; in 1987, it won blue ribbons at the Hamilton County and Harvest Home Fairs in Cincinnati and won a 5th place ribbon at the Ohio State Fair.

It’s wonderful toasted and also a great base for a Reuben sandwich.

POPPYSEED RYE BREAD

  • Servings: Two nine-inch or three 7-½ inch loaves
  • Print
  • 2 Tblsp. fast acting yeast*
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 Tblsp. salt
  • ¼ cup buttermilk powder
  • ¼ cup cocoa
  • 1 Tbsp. caraway seeds
  • 1 Tblsp. poppy seeds
  • 2 cups rye flour
  • ¾ cup whole wheat flour
  • 2 Tblsp. oil
  • ¼ cup molasses
  • 2 cups water
  • 2-½ cups to 3 cups all-purpose flour

*I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast. I buy it in bulk (454 g) and the package says that it is made in Canada. I understand it is packaged under the name “Instant Dry” for distribution through stores like Sam’s, “Rapid Rise” in the U.S. and “Quick Rise” in Canada. The “Instant Dry”, “Rapid Rise” or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.

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In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place yeast, sugar, salt, buttermilk powder, cocoa, caraway seeds, poppy seeds, rye flour and whole wheat flour. Insert paddle beater and beat to blend dry ingredients.

In a four-cup measure, place oil, molasses and water.  Heat in the microwave to 130 degrees F.

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Pour hot mixture into bowl and beat at medium speed for 3 minutes.

Remove paddle beater and insert dough hook.  Continue to beat for 6-1/2 minutes, adding flour a little at a time.   You may not have to use all of the flour – the dough should be smooth and elastic after 6-1/2 minutes.  The dough may feel slightly sticky because of the molasses.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn dough over once and cover with a napkin or tea towel.  Let rise for 45 minutes in a warm place that is free of drafts (I put mine on top of my microwave which sets under a cabinet).

After 45 minutes, punch down dough (press your knuckles into the dough to deflate it) and lay it on a lightly floured surface.  Roll the dough and form into two nine-inch or three 7-½ inch loaves. Turn over and pinch the edges to seal.  Place loaves in greased loaf pans.  Cover and let rise for another 30 minutes.
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Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Bake for approximately 50-60 minutes for nine-inch loaves, 45 minutes for 7-½ inch loaves or until bread is golden brown and has a hollow sound when tapped (210 degrees on a bread thermometer).  Cover with a piece of foil if top is browning too fast.  Remove bread from pans immediately, brush with butter, cover with a napkin or a tea towel and let cool on a wire rack.

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Yield:  Two nine-inch or three 7-½ inch loaves


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I first made this bread in 1988 when it won a ribbon at our county fair.  The recipe came from an old publication called Blue Ribbon Gazette, a collection of blue ribbon winning recipes from around the country.  It’s a nice, sturdy loaf that’s delicious fresh from the oven or toasted.  It’s good to have a loaf tucked away in the freezer to make grilled sandwiches or to serve with soup on a chilly, windy day.

HEALTH BREAD

  • Servings: Two 9-inch or four 7-1/2-inch loaves
  • Print

  • 4-½  cups all purpose flour, divided
  • 2 Tblsp. fast acting yeast*
  • 1 Tblsp. salt
  • ¼ cup buckwheat flour
  • 2 Tblsp. oat bran
  • 2-¼ cups buttermilk heated to 130 degrees F
  • 1/3 cup canola oil
  • 1/3 cup sorghum molasses (or any strong flavored molasses such as Grandma’s)
  • 2-¼ cups whole wheat flour

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*The “Instant“ or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.  Rising time is cut in half.

Grease two 9-inch or four 7-½ inch loaf pans

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, combine 2 cups of all-purpose flour, yeast, salt, buckwheat flour and oat bran. Add 130 degree F buttermilk, oil and molasses.  Beat with a paddle beater at medium speed for 3 minutes.

Remove paddle beater and insert dough hook.  Add 2-¼ cups of whole wheat flour.  Beat a medium speed for 6-½ minutes, gradually adding remaining all-purpose flour until dough is smooth and elastic.  Don’t use more all-purpose flour than you need.  Dough will be a little sticky from the molasses.

Place dough in a greased bowl, turn, cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes.

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Use your knuckles to punch down and deflate the dough.  Form into two 9-inch loaves or four 7-½-inch loaves and place in prepared pans.

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Cover and let rise for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F

Bake 9-inch loaves for approximately 45 minutes; 7-½-inch loaves for approximately 25 minutes or until bread is golden brown and sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom.  Cool on a wire rack. 

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Yield:  Two 9-inch or four 7-½ inch loaves

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I first made this bread in 1995, adapted from a recipe in a cookbook called America’s Best.  I have a note in my binder:  “Good flavor – chewy”.

This makes a hearty bread that is chewy due to the cracked wheat (bulgur).  It’s really delicious toasted and makes a very filling breakfast with a cup of coffee or tea.

CRACKED WHEAT YEAST BREAD

  • Servings: Two nine-inch or three 7-½ inch loaves
  • Print

  • 1 cup cracked wheat (bulgur)
  • 3-1/4 cups water
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 3 T butter
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 2 cups whole-wheat flour
  • 2 Tblps. fast acting yeast*
  • 4to 4-1/2 cups all-purpose flour

*I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast. I buy it in bulk (454 g) and the package says that it is made in Canada. I understand it is packaged under the name “Instant Dry” for distribution through stores like Sam’s, “Rapid Rise” in the U.S. and “Quick Rise” in Canada. The “Instant Dry”, “Rapid Rise” or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.

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Combine cracked wheat and water in medium pan.  Bring to boil, then remove from heat.  Add honey, butter and salt.  Cool to 130 degrees F (this will take about 20 minutes to cool).

Combine whole-wheat flour and yeast in large mixing bowl.  Add cracked-wheat mixture and with the paddle beater, beat @ low speed for 30 seconds and for 3 minutes @ medium speed.  Insert dough hook and knead for 6-1/2 minutes, adding all-purpose flour as necessary until dough is elastic.  Dough may feel a bit sticky because of the honey.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn dough over once and cover with a napkin or tea towel.  Let rise for 30 minutes in a warm place that is free of drafts (I put mine on top of my microwave which sets under a cabinet).

After 30 minutes, punch down dough (press your knuckles into the dough to deflate it) and lay it on a lightly floured surface.  Divide the dough into two portions …

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…and roll each portion to form into a loaf.  Turn over and pinch the edges to seal.  Place loaves in greased 9-inch loaf pans –  cover and let rise for another 30 minutes.
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Preheat oven to  350  degrees F.  Bake for 40-60 minutes until bread is golden brown and has a hollow sound when tapped on the bottom.  Cover with a piece of foil if top is browning too fast.  Remove bread from pan immediately…

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…cover with a napkin or a tea towel and let cool on a wire rack.

Yield:  Two nine-inch or three 7-½ inch loaves

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This recipe was adapted from one in Clayton’s Book of Breads, my favorite cookbook for yeast bread.  I first made this bread in 1993 when I was looking for something tasty and a little different to take to the office  for my morning breakfast toast after an hour-long commute.  I love the light peanut butter flavor and the little bits of peanuts.

PEANUT BUTTER YEAST BREAD

  • Servings: Makes two 7-½ inch loaves
  • Print

  • 3-½ to 4 cups all-purpose flour, divided
  • 1 Tblsp. Instant dry yeast (fast acting)*
  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1-¼ cups 130 degree F water
  • ¼ cup creamy peanut butter
  • ¼ cup finely chopped dry roasted peanuts

*The “Instant“ or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.

Two 7-½ inch loaf pans, greased

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place 1 cup flour, yeast, brown sugar, salt and 130 degree F water.  Begin to mix with paddle beater on medium speed – add peanut butter.  Continue mixing for 3 minutes on medium speed.  Add chopped peanuts and beat for 30 seconds.  Remove paddle beater and insert dough hook.

Beat for 6-½ minutes on medium speed, gradually adding flour as needed until dough is smooth and elastic.  Place in a greased bowl, turn once, cover and place in a warm place to rise for 30 minutes.

Punch down dough with your knuckles to deflate and divide in half.  Place half of dough on a lightly floured board and form into a loaf.  Place in a greased loaf pan.

Repeat with the remaining dough.

Cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F

Remove cover and bake loaves for approximately 35 minutes until surface is brown and bread is done (should sound hollow when tapped on the bottom of the loaf).  Remove from pans to a wire rack to cool.  Brush the tops with melted butter for a softer crust.

Makes two 7-½ inch loaves

A really good way to enjoy this bread is toasted with butter and a little bit of honey.


My youngest daughter makes a wonderful raisin bread in her bread machine.  It’s moist, sweet, slightly spicy – really good.  I don’t own a bread machine, so this is my version that is made with fast rising yeast and an electric mixer.  This is so good fresh and warm from the oven, and a real treat when toasted and buttered.   We also like it in thin slices in a sandwich made with Shannon’s Curry Chicken Salad.

For Shannon’s bread machine recipe, click here.

SHANNON’S GREAT RAISIN BREAD

  • Servings: One 9-inch loaf
  • Print

  • 2 to 3 cups all-purpose flour, divided
  • 3/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/3 cup quick oatmeal
  • 2 Tblsp. light brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1 pkg or 2 tsp. Fleischmann’s Rapid Rise yeast (Quick-Rise in Canada)
  • 7 oz. water, heated to 130 degrees F
  • 2 Tblsp. honey
  • 1-1/2 Tblsp. butter, melted
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 1 tsp. butter for top of loaf after baking

Greased 9-inch loaf pan

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place 1 cup flour, salt, oatmeal, brown sugar, cinnamon, and yeast.  Beat to blend dry ingredients.

Add 130 degree F water, honey, and melted butter.

With paddle beater, mix on medium speed for 3 minutes.

Remove paddle beater and insert dough hook.  Continue to beat for 6-1/2 minutes, adding flour a little at a time.   You may not have to use all of the flour – the dough should be smooth and elastic after 6-1/2 minutes.

Remove bowl from mixer and working in the bowl, add raisins ¼ cup at a time and knead to mix the raisins into the dough.


Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn dough once and cover with a napkin or tea towel.  Let rise for 45 minutes in a warm place that is free of drafts (I put mine on top of my microwave which sets under a cabinet).

After 45 minutes, punch down dough (press your knuckles into the dough to deflate it) and lay it on a lightly floured surface.  Roll the dough and form into a loaf.  Turn over and pinch the edges to seal – I also pushed in any raisins on the bottom of the dough to keep them from sticking to the pan.  Place loaf in greased 9×9 inch loaf pan.  Cover and let rise for another 45 minutes.


Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Bake loaf for approximately 40 to 45 minutes until bread is golden brown and has a hollow sound when tapped.  Cover with a piece of foil if top is browning too fast.  Remove bread from pan immediately, brush with butter, cover with a napkin or a tea towel and let cool on a wire rack.


Yield:  One 9-inch loaf