Anadama Bread and Rolls


I first made this bread in December of 1982 and included mini-loaves in my food gift baskets that year.  This is very good bread and you can definitely taste the hearty texture of the corn meal.   I adapted my recipe from one in a 1976 edition of Redbook Cookbook.

ANADAMA BREAD AND ROLLS

  • Servings: One 9-inch loaf or one 7-3/14-inch loaf plus 10 rolls
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  • 6-1/2 cups all-purpose flour, approx.
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 cup yellow corn meal
  • 2 pkgs instant dry yeast
  • 1 cup water, heated to 130 degrees F
  • 1 cup milk, heated to 130 degrees F
  • 1/2 cup light molasses*
  • 3 Tblsp. butter, melted

*I used some molasses I had bought in Amish country and it has a slight sorghum flavor.  Any good light molasses would work well.

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place 1 cup of flour, the corn meal, yeast, water, milk, molasses and melted butter.  With a paddle beater, beat at medium speed for 3 minutes.

Remove paddle beater and insert dough hook.  Add one cup of flour to the mixture and beat at medium speed, gradually adding 1/2 cup of flour at a time as the dough is being kneaded for 6-1/2 minutes.  Dough should be elastic and smooth, but will be a little sticky to the touch because of the molasses.

Place dough in a greased bowl ….

…cover and let rise in warm place for 30 minutes.

Punch down dough and make into bread and/or rolls.  This amount of dough will make two 9×5 inch loaves or a variety of other combinations.  I chose to make a 7-3/4 inch loaf and 10 large rolls.  Cover and let rise for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Bake the rolls for approximately 12-15 minutes, depending on size.  Bake a 7-3/4 inch loaf of bread for approximately 30 minutes, and a 9×5 inch loaf for 45-55 minutes.

Remove from pans immediately to a wire rack and let cool.

I like to cover the bread with a tea towel while cooling to keep the crust soft.

The bread came out of the oven at noon, just in time for my daughter and me to enjoy it for lunch with a bowl of soup – fantastic!

Incidentally, for busy days, it’s nice to have a box of Campbell’s V-8 soup in the pantry.  Today, we had Southwestern Corn Chowder – really good.

Note:  I always underbake the rolls because I’m going to be browning them in the oven just before serving – usually just two or three at a time.

A November Sunday Dinner

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In the past 9+ years, I’ve been able to find Concord grapes at my supermarket only twice.  This past Friday was one of those days and although I had told my daughters we wouldn’t be having pie for Sunday dinner until after Thanksgiving (to whet their appetites for holiday pies), I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to make one of my favorites.  I posted about my Streusel Concord Grape Pie back in 2007, when I had just begun blogging.  It’s a messy looking pie, but the flavor of the grapes is just incredible.

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Back in the 1980s and 1990s, my husband and I lived on a two-acre plot of land that included every type of fruit that grows well in our southwestern Ohio area, including Concord grapes.  I used to have five-gallon pails of them setting in the kitchen waiting for me to cook up something delicious.  The grape jam and jelly were good but the pie was a family favorite from the beginning.  It takes some time to make, but is well worth it.  Check out the recipe.

Streusel Concord Grape Pie

Our meal was also an old standby – grilled pork tenderloin, sweet potato patties, and Spinach and Mushroom Casserole.

Spinach and Mushroom Casserole

I did try out a different recipe for a marinade, based on one I saw on All Recipes.  It was delicious.

PORK TENDERLOIN MARINADE

  • 2 Tblsp. olive oil
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 Tblsp. teriyaki sauce
  • 1 Tblsp. liquid smoke
  • 1/8 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1/8 tsp. onion salt
  • Grating of black pepper

Mix ingredients in a 9×9 square baking dish.  Add 1/2″ thick slices of pork tenderloin and toss until coated.  Cover and refrigerate for several hours, turning occasionally.  Remove from marinade and grill – I use a stovetop grill.

Above recipe is enough to marinate about 2 lbs. of sliced pork tenderloin.

I served dinner with some fresh homemade potato rolls and enjoyed a beautiful autumn day with my family.

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Easy Potato Yeast Rolls

Really Good Buttermilk Bread/Rolls

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The Sunday dinner I made for my two daughters and two grandchildren seemed like a Thanksgiving preview – in miniature.  We had a small roasted chicken, a small amount of stuffing that would fit in its cavity, mashed potatoes, corn and something that was full sized and then some – buttermilk rolls.  This recipe made a medium loaf and 15 large soft, delicious rolls.

REALLY GOOD BUTTERMILK BREAD/ROLLS

  • Servings: One 9-1/2-inch loaf or one 7-1/2-inch loaf plus 15 rolls
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  • 2 Tblsp. dry fast-acting yeast
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 7-8 cups all-purpose flour, divided
  • 2 cups buttermilk, heated to 130 degrees F
  • 1/2 cup butter, melted
  • 1 egg, room temperature

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place the yeast, salt, soda, sugar and 2 cups of flour.  Add the heated buttermilk and melted butter.  Beat with the paddle beater at medium speed for 3 minutes.  Add the egg and beat for another 30 seconds.

Remove paddle beater and insert bread hook.  Add 2 cups of flour and beat at medium speed for another 6:30 minutes, gradually adding more flour until the dough is smooth and elastic.  You may need a little more or a little less flour.

Place in an oiled bowl, cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes.

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Oil bread pans or baking sheets.  Punch down dough and form into loaves and/or rolls.   This time I chose to use 1/3 of the dough to make a loaf to fit a 7-1/2″x3-1/2″ pan (inside measurement) and pinched off dough about 2″ diameter to make 15 rolls.

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Cover the bread and let rise in a warm place for another 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

When bread has risen, place in oven on middle rack and bake approximately 12 minutes for rolls and 25-45 minutes for loaves, depending on size.

I have a note in my recipe binder:  “Excellent – first made in March, 1988.   From a library book, Miss Mary’s.”

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I like to keep at least 3 thick slices of homemade bread in my freezer for the times when my oldest son stops by for breakfast.  He loves toasted homemade bread with his bacon and eggs.

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For dessert we had an old favorite which I posted in October of 2007, Old Fashioned Plum Streusel Pie.  It was delicious – the purple plums seemed especially flavorful.

In Praise of Buttermilk

Growing up in the years of the Great Depression, we didn’t have milk except from a can.  My mother loved buttermilk but there wasn’t any available in those hungry years.  When my mother was 73, she made an audio tape of family stories and her personal memories.  She said, “It was depression time and we all lived together – one big happy family!  And when you went to the table to eat you had better fill your plate up because it was never going to be passed around again – that was the only chance you were going to get.  But John (her step-father) would not take any kind of welfare or anything, he insisted on working.  And then we moved to Cincinnati where he got a job shoeing mules and the house went with us and the two boys, Frank and my husband, drove John around with blacksmith tools in the back of the car and he would go around and tell the farmers that their horses needed shoeing whether they did or not – even just a re-setting, that was $1.00 a shoe – and he would always come home with some groceries.”

The “house” consisted of the grandparents, my parents and their two children, two teenage boys, two teenage girls and an infant, all living together and trying to survive on the meager earnings of the traveling blacksmith and his two young sons.

In 1935, my father was able to get on the WPA as a laborer and he moved his little family to a one-room flat in downtown Cincinnati.  My mother always said the happiest day of her life was the day she moved into that little room and was finally able to have a place of her own.

My little sister and I continued to have our evaporated milk diluted with water and heavily sugared.  When I went to the first grade at old Raschig School on Central Parkway, imagine my delight at seeing a table wheeled into the room with apple butter sandwiches and huge metal pitchers of honest-to-goodness milk.  My father, remembering the farm-fresh milk of his childhood, straight from the cow, said this was just surplus skim milk provided by the government.  No matter, nothing ever tasted so good to me.

I always loved milk and as I grew older, I learned to appreciate my mother’s favorite, buttermilk.  Whenever we went to a county fair, Mother and I had the treat of a fish sandwich and ice cold buttermilk.  My father was sure we were going to get violently ill from such a combination but we never did.  We both loved that little half-pint carton of milk with big flakes of butter floating around in it.

When I have a cup of buttermilk left over, I like to make these yeast rolls – very simple – very quick – and very good.

EASY BUTTERMILK YEAST ROLLS

  • 5 to 5-1/2 cups all-purpose flour, divided
  • 3 Tblsp. granulated sugar
  • 2-1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 package fast rising yeast
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1/3 cup vegetable or canola oil

In a large mixer bowl place 2 cups of flour, sugar, salt, soda, and yeast.

Heat the buttermilk and water to 130 degrees F.  Add to the flour mixture.  Add the oil.  Beat with mixer paddle at medium speed for 3 minutes.  Insert dough hook and beat for 6:30 minutes longer, adding flour as needed until dough is elastic and no longer sticky.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes.

Punch down dough, form into rolls and place on greased cookie sheets.  Cover and let rise in a warm place for another 30 minutes.  Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Bake rolls in a preheated oven for approximately 12 minutes until golden brown.  Remove to a wire rack to cool.

Makes approximately 18 rolls, depending on size.

Easy Italian Bread

This is an easy Italian bread that I’ve been making for over 20 years.  With fast-rising yeast, a mixer with a dough hook, and directions for quick-mixing, in no time you’ll have two big loaves of hearty bread.

EASY ITALIAN BREAD

  • 2 packages fast-rising dry yeast
  • 2 Tblsp. granulated sugar
  • 2-1/2 tsp. salt
  • 4-1/4 to 4-3/4 cups all-purpose flour, divided
  • 1-3/4 cup water heated to 130 degrees F
  • 2 Tblsp. vegetable oil

In the large bowl of mixer, place yeast, sugar, salt and two cups of flour.  Mix to blend and add the 130 degree F water and oil.  Mix on medium speed with regular beater for 3 minutes.  Insert dough hook and beat for another 6:30 minutes, adding flour as needed to keep dough from being sticky.

Place dough on a floured board, cover with a cloth, and let rest for 10 minutes.  Punch down dough and form into two long narrow loaves.  Place loaves on a greased pan, cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Before placing loaves in oven, moisten your fingers and gently spread water over the top of the loaves.  Cut three slashes in the top with a serrated knife.  Place loaves in oven and bake for approximately 25 minutes.  Remove to a wire rack to cool.  These loaves measure approximately 15 inches long by 6 inches wide.

This is my favorite bread to use as garlic bread, bruschetta, French Toast, stuffing, bread pudding or in any recipe that calls for a sturdy old-fashioned bread.

Honey Whole Wheat Bread and Rolls

Every Wednesday, granddaughter Dolphin comes to my house and most of the time we make bread.  This week we made an old favorite going back over more than 20 years – Honey Whole Wheat Bread.

HONEY WHOLE WHEAT BREAD & ROLLS

  • Servings: One 9-inch loaf or one 7-1/2-inch loaf plus 12 rolls
  • Print

  • 2 packages fast rising dry yeast
  • 2 cups of whole wheat flour (Gold Medal)
  • 1/2 cup instant potato flakes
  • 1/2 cup non-fat dry milk
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 2 cups of water heated to 130 degrees F
  • 3 Tblsp. oil
  • 3 Tblsp. honey
  • 3-4 cups all-purpose flour (Gold Medal)

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place yeast, whole wheat flour, instant potato flakes, dry milk and salt.  Stir to blend.  Add heated water, oil and honey.  With paddle beater, beat at medium speed for 3 minutes.  Insert dough hook and continue beating for another 6:30 minutes, adding all-purpose flour as required to make dough springy and not sticky.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, cover and let rise in a warm place for 30 minutes.  Punch down, form into loaves and/or rolls, place formed dough on oiled pans, cover and let rise for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Bake loaves, according to size, for 25 to 45 minutes until golden brown on top and loaves sound hollow when tapped.  Bake rolls for 12-15 minutes, according to size.  I like to bake one loaf of bread in a medium size 7-1/2″ pan for 25 minutes and form 12 rolls from the remaining dough to bake on a large cookie sheet for 12 minutes.

Dolphin and I enjoy a roll fresh from the oven with butter and a drizzle of honey.

Back when I first started making Honey Whole Wheat Bread, my aunt and then later my mother were fighting cancer and nothing tasted good to them but this bread.  I made each one a loaf every week until even this fresh bread didn’t taste good to them any more.   My aunt passed away in 1989 and my mother in 1991.  I know they would be happy to think that Dolphin is enjoying the bread now.

Rye Bread and Reubens

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My daughters say they have never found a restaurant version of the Reuben Sandwich that is as good as the one I make, mainly because of my insistence on very lean, good quality corned beef, and because of my homemade rye bread.  They like this rye bread, called “Modest” probably because it is a light rye with no caraway or other strong flavor.

MODEST RYE BREAD

  • Servings: 2 7-1/2-inch loaves plus 4 large rolls
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  • 5 cups all-purpose flour, divided
  • 1 cup rye flour
  • 1 package fast-rising yeast
  • 3/4 cup non-fat dry milk
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 2 Tblsp. molasses
  • 3 Tblsp canola oil
  • 2-1/4 cups water heated to 130 degrees F

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place 1 cup of all-purpose flour, 1 cup of rye flour, yeast, dry milk, and salt.  Mix to blend and add molasses, oil and 130 degree F water.  Beat on medium speed with regular beater for 3 minutes.  Insert dough hook and beat another 6:30 minutes, adding flour as needed to make dough elastic and not sticky.

Place dough in oiled bowl, cover and let rise in warm place for 30 minutes.

Punch down dough and form into loaves.  I like to divide the dough in thirds and place a third in each of two loaf pans which measure 7-1/2 x 3-3/4 x 2-1/4 inches.  This size makes a nice size slice for making the Reubens.  The remaining third is usually made into large hearty rolls to eat with dinner.

Cover the bread/rolls and let rise 30 minutes.  Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Bake this size loaf for approximately 25 minutes and the rolls for approximately 12 minutes.  Let cool on a wire rack.

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REUBEN SANDWICHES

  • 1 lb. good quality corned beef, sliced thin
  • 1/2 lb. sliced Swiss cheese
  • 1 cup sauerkraut, drained
  • Rye bread

To make the sandwiches, I prefer to bake the bread a day ahead of time so it’s more manageable to divide into thin slices (cut off the heels and cut about 12 slices).  Butter a slice of bread and place butter-side-down in a skillet, add a layer of corned beef, a slice of Swiss cheese and a spoonful of sauerkraut, add second slice of buttered bread.  Grill, browning on each side, at a medium high heat to give the beef and cheese a chance to warm before the bread gets too brown.

Serve immediately.  My daughters like to add Thousand Island Dressing to their sandwiches.  The two loaves of bread are about right for the quantity of corned beef, Swiss and sauerkraut, depending on how thick you make your sandwiches. 

Easy Potato Yeast Rolls

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I make bread at least once a week, and these are the rolls I bake most often.  They are quick and easy to make, delicious, and freeze well.

EASY POTATO YEAST ROLLS

  • 2 packages fast acting yeast
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 Tblsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup dry potato flakes
  • 6-7 cups flour, divided
  • 2-1/4 cups water heated to 130 degrees F
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil
In large bowl of electric mixer, place yeast, sugar, salt, potato flakes and two cups of flour – mix together to blend.  Pour in 130 degree water and oil.  Beat on medium speed for 3 minutes with regular beater.  Insert dough hook and beat 6-1/2 minutes longer, adding flour 1/2 cup at a time, using enough to make dough elastic and no longer sticky.  Cover dough and let rise in a warm spot for 30 minutes.
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Punch down dough and form into approximately 24 rolls.  Place rolls on lightly greased cookie sheets, cover and let rise 30 minutes.
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Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
Bake rolls approximately 12 minutes until golden brown.  Remove from cookie sheets to rack to cool.

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Walt’s Polish Stuffing

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I call this “Polish Stuffing” only because I got the general instructions from a wonderful Polish gentleman in my office (about 20 years ago).  I’m sure he used some kind of great sausage and maybe some extra herbs, but this was my version and my family always wants a side casserole of this stuffing for Thanksgiving.  I don’t stuff the bird with it in consideration of those who don’t like spicy ingredients in their turkey.  First, though, I make the bread that I use, an adaptation of an old Saco Buttermilk Powder recipe.

HERB BREAD FOR STUFFING

  • 4-1/4 to 4-3/4 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 packages fast-rising yeast
  • 1/4 cup SACO buttermilk powder
  • 2 Tblsp. granulated sugar
  • 2-1/2 tsp. salt
  • 2 Tblsp. shortening
  • 1-3/4 cups of water heated to 130 degrees F
  • 1 tsp. sage
  • 2 tsp. celery seed
  • 1/8 tsp. nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp. black pepper

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place 2 cups of flour, yeast, buttermilk powder, sugar, salt.  Mix to blend and add the 130 degree F water and shortening.  Beat on medium high for 3 minutes.  Insert dough hook and add sage, celery, seed, nutmeg and pepper.  Beat for a total of 6-1/2 minutes more, adding flour as necessary to make a stiff dough.  If necessary, knead a small amount of flour into the dough by hand.  Cover and place in a warm spot to rise for 30 minutes.  Punch down and spread dough in a thin layer in an oiled jelly roll pan.  Cover and let rise for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.  Bake bread for approximately 15 minutes until dough has baked through and the top is golden brown.

Let cool on a wire rack.  Best to make the bread the day before use and then cut it into small cubes.

Note:  If I don’t have time to make this bread, I use a purchased 14 oz. bag of seasoned bread cubes.

RECIPE FOR WALT’S POLISH STUFFING

  • 1 lb. of good spicy hot pork sausage, cooked until the pink is gone
  • 1 cup celery, chopped
  • 1 cup onion, chopped
  • 12 cups of herb bread cubes or 14 oz. pkg.
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Mix all of the above ingredients together and place in an oiled baking dish.  Cover and bake approximately 20 minutes @ 350 degrees F.  Uncover and bake another 10 minutes.

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Spicy Honey Raisin Yeast Bread

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What can you serve for a beautiful weekend morning breakfast that is a little bit different from what is too quickly eaten on weekdays?  How about a slice of this fragrant loaf of bread, studded with plump raisins, and slathered with butter?  After all, we can splurge on the weekends, can’t we?  Take time to really read the newspaper or a good book, have the coffee nice and hot, and relax for just a little while.

SPICY HONEY RAISIN BREAD

  • Servings: One 9-inch or two 7-inch loaves
  • Print

1 pkg fast-rising dry yeast

1 tsp. salt

4 to 5 cups all-purpose flour, divided

1 cup milk, heated to 110 degrees F

1 egg, room temperature

1/2 cup honey

2-1/4 tsp. ground coriander

1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon

1/8 tsp. ground cloves

1/4 cup melted butter or margarine

1 cup raisins

In large bowl of electric mixer, with regular beater, place yeast, salt and two cups of flour.  Add heated milk and beat at medium speed for 3 minutes.  Add egg, honey, spices and butter/margarine – beat to mix.  Insert dough hook and add remaining flour, a half-cup or so at a time, beating for a total of 6 minutes.  Enough flour should be added as you beat to keep dough from being sticky.  Put dough on floured surface and hand-knead raisins in, about 1/4 cup at a time.  Place in greased bowl and cover – let rise in warm place for 30 minutes.

Punch down dough and divide between two 7 inch, greased bread pans.  Cover and let rise 30 minutes.  Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.  Bake @ 375 degrees F for approximately 45 minutes.  Remove from pans and cool on rack.

Note:  Can also be baked in one 9 inch greased loaf pan for approximately 45 minutes.

Yield:  One 9 inch or two 7 inch loaves