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chick-brocc-top

This dish for supper incorporated mushrooms and broccoli which needed to be used, roasted chicken breast which I always have in the freezer, and some tasty Asian condiments.  I added the dried cranberries and walnuts for extra crunch and color.  A very tasty and satisfying meal.

TERIYAKI CHICKEN, VEGETABLES AND RICE

  •     1 tsp olive oil
  •     Large sweet onion, sliced
  •     1 cup mushrooms, sliced
  •     2 cups broccoli florets, steamed fork tender
  •     1 cup cooked chicken breast, shredded
  •     ½ tsp. sesame oil
  •     Dash or two of Mongolian Fire Oil (optional)
  •     1/4 cup teriyaki sauce
  •     2 Tblsp. dried cranberries
  •     2 Tblsp. chopped walnuts

 

  •     4 servings of cooked rice

In a large non-stick skillet, heat the olive oil and saute the onion slices over medium heat until translucent.

Add mushroom slices and cook until mushrooms start to soften.  Sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper.

Stir in steamed broccoli, cooked chicken breast, sesame oil, fire oil and teriyaki sauce.
chick-brocc-veg

Cook until mixture is hot and serve over cooked rice with a sprinkle of cranberries and walnuts on top.

4 servings
chick-brocc-bot

pot-pnb-top

I hate to throw away food, even one cup of potato chip pieces.  These cookies are a good way to use up the chips and have a nice, crisp cookie to enjoy.  The peanut butter chips add a nice additional flavor.

POTATO CHIP-PEANUT BUTTER COOKIES

  • ½ cup light brown sugar
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • ½ cup butter, softened
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • 1-¼ cups all-purpose flour
  • ¾ cup peanut butter chips
  • 1 cup crushed potato chips

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F

Have two ungreased cookie sheets ready

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, place the light brown sugar, granulated sugar and softened butter.  Beat until smooth and creamy.  Add the egg and vanilla and beat to blend.  Mix in soda and then gradually add flour, beating just until all of the flour is incorporated.

By hand, stir in the peanut butter chips and potato chips – batter will be quite stiff.

pot-pnb-chips

Using a rounded kitchen teaspoon, drop on ungreased sheets, 2 inches apart.

pot-pnb-bkd
Bake @ 350 degrees F for 8-10 minutes until golden brown.

Remove cookies immediately to a rack to cool.
pot-pnb-rack

Makes about two dozen small cookies.  Do not refrigerate or freeze to keep potato chip crumbs crispy.

pot-pnb-bot

NYcr-top

In the 1960s, we used to buy some wonderful streusel-topped squares at a little bakery in Oakley (suburb of Cincinnati). Everyone loved the thick topping and I’ve never found a streusel quite like the one from the old German bakery. This one comes very close, although I believe the bakery squares were made with yeast rather than being a quick bread. This is truly a quick bread to put together to get really good results. The cake is soft and tender and the topping is crunchy and sweet. We used it today as our Sunday dessert. The recipe was adapted from one on Fake Ginger.

NEW YORK STYLE CRUMB CAKE

Crumb topping:

  • 1/2 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • ¾ tsp. cinnamon
  • ½ cup (1 stick) melted butter
  • 1-1/4 cups all-purpose flour

Cake:

  • 1-1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 tsp. baking powder
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • 6 Tblsp. butter, softened
  • 3/4 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 egg
  • ½ cup plus 2 Tblsp. sour cream
  • ½ tsp. vanilla extract

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Butter the sides and bottom of a 9×9 pan.

Make the crumb topping first:

Mix both sugars, salt, and cinnamon in a medium bowl. Add the melted butter and whisk until combined. Fold in the flour until it is absorbed. Spread out a large sheet of parchment paper on a flat pan and spread this mixture out on the parchment paper to dry while mixing the cake.

NYcr-parchTo make the cake:

Whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a medium bowl and set aside.

In the large bowl of an electric mixer, cream the butter and sugar until fluffy. Add the egg and beat until incorporated. Scrape down the bowl and add the sour cream and vanilla, beating until just incorporated.

Add the dry ingredients 1/3 at a time, beating only until incorporated and scraping down the bowl each time.

Spread the batter in the prepared pan. The dough is quite stiff and by wetting your fingertips with water, you can spread the dough evenly in the pan.

NYcr-cakepn

Use your hand to scoop up a handful of topping and make a fist. The topping should hold together. Break off in pea-sized chunks and drop them all over the cake. Use all of the topping, sprinkling the crumbs on the top of the cake evenly.

NYcr-topp

Bake the cake in a preheated 350 degree F oven for approximately 40 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the middle of the cake comes out clean.

Cool in the pan on a wire rack for 30 minutes before serving.

NYcr-bkd

Yield: 9 servings

NYcr-bot

 

Bonanza-baked2

I bought some self-rising flour for a special recipe and was looking for a way to use the rest of it since I prefer all-purpose flour for my baking. In checking the internet, I saw it wasn’t generally recommended to use self-rising flour in yeast bread but then found an old recipe of mine from 9 years ago that used baking powder in yeast bread. I thought maybe the self-rising flour would work here and it did. The bread has a different texture from my usual bread and is soft with a crispy crust. I particularly enjoy the crunch of the sunflower seeds and the slight grittiness of the corn meal.

BONANZA BREAD

  • 3 cups (approx.) of self-rising flour, divided
  • 1/4 cup yellow corn meal
  • 1 Tblsp. fast rising yeast *
  • ¾ cup water
  • 3 Tblsp. canola oil
  • 3 Tblsp. honey
  • 1 egg plus one egg yolk – reserve white of one egg (room temperature)
  • Reserved egg white mixed with 1/2 tsp. water
  • 1-1/2 Tblsp. sunflower seeds

*I use Fleischmann’s Instant Dry Yeast. I buy it in bulk (454 g) and the package says that it is made in Canada. I understand it is packaged under the name “Instant Dry” for distribution through stores like Sam’s, “Rapid Rise” in the U.S. and “Quick Rise” in Canada. The “Instant Dry”, “Rapid Rise” or “Quick Rise” yeast is especially formulated to be used mixed with the dry ingredients and can withstand the hot water.

One 9-inch loaf pan, greased

In large bowl of electric mixer, combine 1-1/2 cups flour, corn meal, yeast, baking powder and salt. Mix to blend.

In a 2-cup measure, place water, oil and honey. Heat to 130 degrees F. Add the honey mixture to the dry ingredients. Using a paddle beater, beat on medium speed for 2-1/2 minutes. Add egg and egg yolk (room temperature) and beat for another 30 seconds.

Bonanza-eggs

Insert dough hooks and beat for an additional 6-1/2 minutes, adding flour as necessary to knead the dough until it is smooth and elastic. It will feel a bit sticky because of the honey.

Place dough in an oiled bowl, turn dough over once and cover with a napkin or tea towel. Let rise for 45 minutes in a warm place that is free of drafts (I put mine on top of my microwave which sets under a cabinet).

Bonanza-rise

After 45 minutes, punch down dough (press your knuckles into the dough to deflate it) and lay it on a lightly floured surface. Roll the dough and form into a loaf. Turn over and pinch the edges to seal.

Brush top of loaf with egg white mixture …

Bonanza-white

and invert loaf onto a large pan covered with sunflower seeds.

Bonanza-seeds

Press to make seeds stick to dough.

Bonanza-ready

Place bread seed-side-up in greased 9-inch pan. Cover and let rise for another 45 minutes.

Bonanza-inpan

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Bake loaf for approximately 40 to 45 minutes until bread is golden brown and has a hollow sound when tapped (200 degrees F on bread thermometer). Cover with a piece of foil if top is browning too fast. Remove bread from pan immediately and let cool on a wire rack.

Yield: One 9-inch loaf

Bonanza-knife
One of my Christmas gifts this past year was a wonderful bread knife with a serrated blade and a wooden guide to help cut ½ inch to 5/8 inch slices.

fromN-breadknife

My daughter found my knife in an antique store but they have a web site here http://www.mountainwoods.com/category.cfm/Category/43.htm. I also saw some listings on eBay. I love this knife for slicing bread. The trick is to allow a tiny bit of space between the bread and the wooden guide. I read that it’s best to store the knife with the blades facing down and found the perfect spot on my vintage ladle rack.

muff-knife

 

 

 

pinset-best

I’ve been wanting a Harker Hotoven rolling pin for a long time  and finally found one at an antique store in Lebanon, Ohio, for a reasonable price.

pinset-cu

When I got it home, I realize I already had a pie plate in the same pattern.  It is quite discolored and crazed, which I don’t mind.  It shows that it has been used to bake a lot of pies.  My daughter found the rack at a thrift store for $4 and it’s perfect for displaying the two pieces.

Today, we visited a local thrift store and found a Universal water bottle with a beautiful marigold pattern.  I love these vintage patterns for china and pottery.

univ-water-2

I also found a lovely pale pink and green Hull vase which is perfect for displaying while I’m waiting for spring to arrive.

Hull-best2

These two items were only $15 each – a bargain even with a few imperfections.

To add to a week of very nice collectibles, my daughter gave me this darling 2-inch high pitcher for St. Patrick’s Day.

horsepitch-best

It was  a very good week for collectibles.

mandarin-top

This dish is adapted from an internet recipe from several years ago.  I no longer remember the source, but this makes a delicious light lunch with a lot of different textures and crunch going on.  I highly recommend just a light drizzle of sesame oil – the mild, smoky flavor is wonderful.

MANDARIN-PINEAPPLE-CHICKEN WRAPS

  • 4 burrito size wraps
  • 6 oz. cream cheese, divided
  • 2 cups cooked chicken breast, shredded
  • Sesame oil for drizzling
  • 2 green onions, chopped, including green part
  • ½ cup red bell pepper, diced
  • 8 oz. can of pineapple tidbits, drained*
  • 8-10 oz. can of mandarin oranges, drained*
  • ½ cup salted cashews

*Save the drained juice for other uses – too good to throw away.  I always have a jar in the freezer to save bits of drained juice and just mix it together to use in gelatin desserts.
mandarin-place

Place burrito wrap on a flat surface and spread burrito with ¼ of the cream cheese.

mandarin-crch

Add ½ cup of chicken breast, drizzle lightly with sesame oil.  Add ¼ of green onions,
mandarin-onion

bell pepper, pineapple, oranges

mandarin-fruit

and salted cashews.

mandarin-cashew

Fold top and bottom of wrap, roll from one side to make a tight roll.

mandarin-roll

Cover with plastic wrap.  Repeat with remaining three wraps.  Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.

When ready to serve, remove plastic wrap, place burrito on plate and cut in half on diagonal.

4 servings

mandarin-bot

TextLillian1936

By the time I was born in 1932, radio was available, but not to people like my family who had no money for frivolous things, sometimes barely enough for necessities like food.  My father was always fascinated with radio and by the time we had moved to a one room flat in 1935 and he had a job with the WPA, making enough to feed his family, he started building crystal sets.  As he progressed in the WPA, going from the lowliest laborer to time-keeper, we came up in the world and moved to a two-room flat and had a pretty nice radio.  I can remember one playing while we sat at the kitchen table in the morning.  I liked the jingle that four young guys sang (lyrics the way I remember them):

    Shine your shoes and you’ll wear a smile
    Shine your shoes and you’ll be in style
    The sun shines east and the sun shines west
    But Griffin polish shines the best.
    Some folks are not particular
    How they look around their feet,
    But if they wore shoes upon their heads,
    They’d make sure their shoes looked neat.
    So, keep your shoes shining all the time,
    All the time, it’s the time to shine
    When you hear this familiar chime (ding, dong, ding)
    It’s time to shine.

Forty years later, I found out it was the young Williams brothers singing the jingle, including the youngest, Andy Williams, who would become one of my favorite singers in the 1960s.

We listened to the Farm Hour, with reports on grain futures and cattle sales, along with weather reports.  The broadcast came from a model-farm type operation and they always talked to the farmer about what he was going to do that day on the farm and sometimes to his wife about her cooking and housekeeping tips.

My parents - 1940

My parents – 1940

Mother kept the radio on all day while she did her housework, favoring the country music of Mother Maybelle and the Carter Family, Cowboy Copas, and Mac Wiseman, learning songs that she later sang to us.  The sadder the ballad, the better, as far as Mother was concerned.  She never complained, never cried, always had a pleasant smile on her face, but she loved the most doleful, tragic ballads where people died and roses twined around their tombstones.

Mother - 1945

Mother – 1945

My father liked sports broadcasts – baseball, football and the boxing matches.  I can still hear the tinny sound of the announcer from Madison Square Gardens in New York, announcing the name of Joe Louis and his unlucky opponent.  We all listened to the news broadcasts and shows like Jack Benny, Fibber McGee and Molly, and Lux Radio Theater.

Lillian and Shirley - 1940

Lillian and Shirley – 1940

Just before World War II, we could afford to move to a four-room apartment and my father managed to get a wonderful radio that had a green eye that vibrated and pulsed with each sound coming out of it.  The radio was glorious and my little sister and I loved to watch the magic eye do its gyrations.  It was on this radio that we heard the news on a wintry Sunday that Pearl Harbor had been bombed and we were now in the middle of World War II.  Throughout the war and for several years afterwards, the radio continued to be the major form of information and entertainment in American homes.  Our family gathered in the living room around the radio, everybody doing something besides just listening – my parents reading, my sister and I lying on the floor with puzzles or coloring books or paper dolls.

On Saturday nights, we usually listened to a barn dance show, probably the precursor of Grand Ole Opry, and heard someone “calling Rattler from the barn – Huyh, Rattler, Huyh, Huyh” and some guy saying, “I’m going back to the wagon, folks – these shoes is killing me”.

Shirley and Lillian - 1943

Shirley and Lillian – 1943

I can remember sitting in the kitchen with the radio playing Fred Allen while we ate a supper of leftovers from a big Sunday dinner – fried chicken, potato pancakes made from the mashed potatoes, the remaining meringue-covered chocolate or coconut cream pie.

Of course, we loved The Shadow –  “Who knows what evil lurks in the thoughts of man — The Shadow knows!”; Bull Drummond; Your Hit Parade and the latest song by Frank Sinatra (a young, skinny kid at that time);  The Lone Ranger and Tonto; Little Orphan Annie and Jack Armstrong and so many others.  We always wound up each New Year’s Eve listening to Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians.

Radio was so important to us until one day in 1946 when figures appeared on a tiny screen in my father’s workshop as he built our first television set and radio was never a very big deal again.

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