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Fallpitchers (4)

I have a large collection of vintage creamers and sugar bowls which I use for flower arrangements.  I had just gotten some of my autumn-looking pieces out of storage when my daughter came home with a $6 bouquet from the grocery store and made the old china even more beautiful.

Fallpitchers (5)

Fallpitchers (6)

Fallpitchers (8)

Fallpitchers (1)

Ban-Pumpk-top
I adapted this recipe from one found on Veronica’s Cornucopia for Wacky Pumpkin Spice Cake.   Without eggs or milk, this makes a wonderfully moist, soft cake and the light glaze makes a cupcake that’s not too sweet or rich.

BANANA PUMPKIN CUPCAKES WITH MAPLE GLAZE

1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup granulated sugar
1 tsp. cinnamon
½  tsp. nutmeg
1/4 tsp. ginger
½ tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking soda
½ cup banana puree
1/2 cup pumpkin puree (not pie filling)
¾ cup water
1/4 cup vegetable oil (Canola)
1 tablespoon white vinegar
1 tsp. banana extract
½ cup chopped walnuts

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour 12 cupcake sections or insert 12 paper or silicone cups.

In a large bowl mix together the flour, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, salt, and baking soda.  In a separate bowl, whisk together the banana, pumpkin, water, oil, vinegar, and banana extract.

Ban-Pump-1

Whisk the wet ingredients into the dry until thoroughly combined. Stir in the chopped nuts.  Pour into the prepared cupcake pan …
Ban-Pumpk-2

…and bake for approximately 22-24 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in center of a cupcake comes out clean.

Allow the cupcakes to stay in the pan for five minutes. After five minutes, remove the cupcakes from the silicone liners and allow to cool completely on a rack.
Ban-Pumpk-3

Maple Glaze
¼ cup powdered sugar
1 Tblsp. maple syrup
¼ tsp. oil (Canola)

Mix the sugar, syrup and oil with a spoon until smooth.

Ban-Pumpk-4

While the cupcakes are still warm, place about ½ tsp. of Maple Glaze on top of the cakes and swirl around with the back of a spoon.
Ban-Pumpk-5

Yield:  12 cupcakes

Ban-Pumpk-bot

Vintage Embroidery

Whenever my two daughters and I get together, they always pull out some kind of handwork to do – knitting, crocheting, embroidery, tatting.  Since I’ve always done my piecing and quilting by machine, I rarely have something to work on.  I decided to try some very simple embroidery using vintage 1930s-40s style patterns.  They are easy enough for my limited skills and I like the patterns which remind me of the embroidery all of the women in my family were doing in that era.  My daughter and I have a large collection of vintage patterns and I’ve been able to add patterns from some good online sites.

I embroider the panel (usually 8-½ x 8-½ inches) and then use scraps to make up something useful.  I don’t want to gather a drawer full of embroidered squares, so unless it’s a seasonal pattern, I make it up quickly.  Another goal of mine this year has been to eliminate bags of small scraps – smaller than 4×4 inches – and I’ve managed to do that.  The only fabric I’ve bought up to this point is some good off-white fabric for embroidery and to use to assemble the scrap blocks.  Here are some of the items I’ve finished this summer:

A cushion set for my vintage folding chair ….

007

005

A small wall hanging of an old kitchen stove …

kitstove

kitstove-cu

A pillow with a design I adapted from an old postcard …
chick-full

chick-cu

A wall hanging with a crow and sunflower center.  I hand quilted around this design and machine quilted the remainder of the hanging.
crowSF-full

Crow-SF-center

A table pad with a Mexican theme …

82815

82816

I still have a stack of completed embroidered panels to use.

82821

Here are some links to free vintage embroidery patterns:

http://mytransfers.blogspot.com/
http://www.patternbee.com/FREEPATTERNS3.html
http://www.french-knots.com
http://www.needlecrafter.com

Click on photos to enlarge.

 

 

granite-schoolplt

I  have so many wonderful collectibles acquired over the last 80+ years.  Some were gifts, some were part of my life growing up, some are inherited, some were purchased at antique malls and thrift stores  – all are precious to me.  Some items are kept up year-around while others are brought out seasonally and on holidays.  Unfortunately, many priceless-to-me objects go undisplayed and unseen for years.  Each wek, I’m going to pull out an item and post COLLECTIBLE OF THE WEEK.

The day after Labor Day will always mean the first day of school to me, even though my grandchildren and great-grandchildren have been in school since the third week of August.  It just seems appropriate for school to begin again in September.  I brought out my antique granite ware alphabet plate (pictured above), made in Austria.  My daughter painted the old-fashioned school scene.

Birthday gifts one year were this 1930s era pencil box with the Scotties along with a little case that has a 1929 postage stamp affixed.

Scottie-pencil-case

Inside the box are all the items needed to start out a successful school year, including a holder for a pen nib.  We used these pen holders and dipped the pens in an ink hole on our desks for penmanship lessons and adding new spelling words to a thin pad of paper that was covered in oilcloth.

scottie-pencil-ins

I’m lucky to have my father’s two arithmetic books which he would have been using in about 1918-19.…

G-Day-arithbks

…and four of my mother’s books with notations from her eighth grade class in 1929-30.

Mount-books

I loved school from the first day to the last day of the last year and enjoy seeing these old keepsakes.

Cherry Lemon Scones

Cherry LemSc- botWhen I first started blogging in 2007, I found Sweet Rosie’s blog (http://sweetrosie.wordpress.com/2014/08/04/lovely-scones-for-sharing/) and have followed and loved it ever since.  She has some amazing recipes from Australia and a recent one was a scone that used two ingredients I didn’t have on hand – cream and Schweppe’s Lemonade.  I substituted undiluted evaporated milk plus butter for the cream and 7-Up soft drink (regular) for the Schweppe’s.  This produced the best scones I ever made, so on the next try some lemon peel, lemon extract, and dried cherries were added.  A new favorite was born.

Here is my adapted version:

CHERRY LEMON SCONES

2-½ cups all-purpose flour
1 Tblsp.  baking powder
1 tsp. salt
¼ cup confectioners’ sugar (plus a small amount for sifting on top of baked scones)
1 tsp. grated lemon peel
¼ cup butter, cut into small cubes
½ cup dried cherries
1/2 cup 7-Up soft drink (regular)
½ cup undiluted evaporated milk
1 tsp. lemon extract

 

 

Cherry LemSc-1

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F
Line a baking sheet with parchment paper

Mix together flour, baking powder, salt, 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar and lemon peel.  Cut in butter.  Mix in the cherries.

Cherry LemSc- cherries

Stir in with a fork the 7-Up, cream and lemon extract.

Cherry LemSc- mix

Form into a craggy, moist circle about 8 inches wide …

Cherry LemSc- disc

… and place on parchment lined sheet.  With floured knife, cut into 8 wedges.

Cherry LemSc- wedge

Separate wedges to allow some space between each one.

Cherry LemSc- sep
Bake in preheated 375 degree oven for 20-25  minutes.

Place on rack to cool and sift confectioners’ sugar over the top.

Cherry LemSc- rack

Enjoy while still warm.

Cherry LemSc- top

To reheat scones, place scones on a baking pan in a cold oven.  Turn the oven to 350 degrees F and let warm until it reaches 350.  Immediately, turn off the oven and remove the scones.  This method warms them just the right amount to make them taste freshly-baked.

grapep-top

I  have so many wonderful collectibles acquired over the last 80+ years.  Some were gifts, some were part of my life growing up, some were inherited, some were purchased at antique malls, gift shops or thrift stores  – all are precious to me.  Some items are kept up year-around while others are brought out seasonally and on holidays.  Unfortunately, many priceless-to-me objects go undisplayed and unseen for years, so each week, I’m going to pull out an item and post a COLLECTIBLE OF THE WEEK.

Once a year, if I’m lucky, I find Concord grapes at a farm market and make Streusel Concord Grape Pie.  It’s probably my favorite pie and I get out my vintage pie-baking utensils to make it.

There’s a little bit of work involved, including putting the cooked grape pulp through a food mill ….

grapep-mill

The dough is rolled out with a one-piece rolling pin my mother gave me over 40 years ago.

grapep-pin

I use a pie pan that my toddler children gave me for Christmas in 1956 after they carefully saved up enough Wilson evaporated milk labels to get it.

grapep-pan

Actually, I don’t use the pastry blender at all but have it among my collection of depression-green handled utensils.  I once heard Alton Brown, TV food expert, say that mixing with the hands provided exactly the right amount of warmth for making good pastry and that’s the way my grandmothers, mother and I had been doing it all along.

grapep-pastryb

I used my vintage kitchen items to make a Streusel Concord Grape Pie on this past Sunday and it’s still my favorite.

 

revgrape

If you’re fortunate enough to find some Concord grapes and don’t mind spending a little time peeling them, here is my recipe.  http://lillianscupboard.wordpress.com/2007/09/24/streusel-concord-grape-pie/

VS-cu

I’m still working on my goals for this year of using up all of the small scraps I have.  I found a lot of fussy-cut scraps from some material I bought 5 years ago to make this apron which won a blue ribbon at our county fair.

fullapron

I used a few more pieces in small projects but still had a lot of scraps that I couldn’t bear to throw away.  I used them along with some green/yellow scraps to make this wall hanging.

VS-Q

I pieced the squares on-point and for the corners found a vintage pillow cover fabric among my scraps to use as corners.

VS-corner

I still had some odd-shaped pieces of fabric left and put those together with scraps to make a cover for a large cushion.

VS-pillow-cu

VS-pillow

I’m down to one large bag of scraps to work with now – brown, tan, and orange shades.  I might make my goal of emptying all of the bags by the end of the year.

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