I store all kinds of things about cooking, quilting and some surprises in my cupboard. Check it out.

Knitting for the Children of Pine Ridge

fullsizerenderThis summer, my younger daughter and I discovered a charity which accepts all kinds of cold weather items for their children on a Lakota Indian reservation in South Dakota.  They have very severe winters and say they are under-served at this location, grateful for anything hand-knit or crocheted that will help keep the children warm.  Unlike most of the charities we support, they accept not only acrylic but also wool and wool blend items and are currently trying to get enough scarves and mittens to supply each of their children in grades K-12.  In August, we mailed some items I had made…four hats, four pr. mittens and two scarves.

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In addition, my daughter contributed 11 hats, 12 pr mittens and 10 scarves.

As of this date, they have collected enough hats but still need lots of scarves and mittens.  Today, I’ll be mailing 5 beautiful pairs of mittens from my daughter …

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I contributed 3 scarves …

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pr-school-0916-2

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…one scarf/mitten set ….

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…two neck warmers ….

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pr-school-0916-8
…and one neck warmer/hat/mitten set.

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We’ll continue to work on items for this project until they reach their goal, hopefully by November 1.

This is the link through Ravelry:

http://www.ravelry.com/discuss/for-the-children-of-pine-ridge/3461082/651-675#665

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Knit-Your-Bit – Scarves for Vets

Last Christmas, I asked my younger daughter (an experienced and avid knitter) to gift me with a box of knitting supplies so I could try once again to knit and make some useful items for one of the many charities she supports.  She gave me a wonderful package of instructions, needles, markers and a good supply of red, white and blue yarn.  The yarn was specifically for Knit-Your-Bit, a program at the National WWII Museum in New Orleanshttp://www.nww2m.com/2016/09/knit-your-bit-celebrates-10-years-50000-scarves-for-veterans/

They collect hand-knit scarves for veterans and one event I especially admire is the gift of a scarf to each veteran who comes to the museum on November 11.  My first projects were scarves for this cause …

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…and I later made some in different colors ….

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My daughter usually makes one scarf a month for this cause and a week or so ago packaged up all of the scarves we had made this year and shipped them to the museum.  Imagine my delight when a picture appeared on their Facebook page showing a gentleman holding one of my scarves!

14355067_10154177352057535_8485403121546007885_nPhoto used with permission of the National WWII Museum

A close-up of the tag that’s on the scarf reveals that it was part of our large group of scarves – how amazing is that?

I love thinking that a veteran will be wearing one of our scarves or one of the hundreds that have been donated from across the country.

http://www.nww2m.com/2016/09/knit-your-bit-celebrates-10-years-50000-scarves-for-veterans/

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Mother’s Family Stories–Installment 12

My mother’s 100th birthday will be this November (Martha Evelyn Mount, born November 28, 1916, in Morrow, Ohio and passed away on July 31, 1991).  When she was 72 in 1989, she made a taped recording of family stories for both sides of the family.  In her honor, and still incredulous that she sat and dictated all of this into a tape recorder by herself, I’m going to post what she wrote along with pictures whenever possible.  She had a rather rambling, random method and said whatever came to her mind at that moment, punctuated by hearty laughing.   I’ll post the stories in the order she told them and will only edit the posts to keep out anything that might be offensive or embarrassing to other members of the family.

8/89 – Family Stories Tape by Martha Applegate
Transcribed 5/19/01 by Lillian – notes in parenthesis by Lillian

INSTALLMENT 12

I used to love to go and visit my Aunt Hettie (Hettie Conover Gillis) – she lived on a farm and I had one cousin one year older than me and one, one year younger (Alberta or Roberta and Mildred Gillis), so we made a good group.  We would play in the barn – oh, I loved that old barn and I still love old barns to this day.  I can just imagine I can smell that hay and those cows being milked.  We’d play in the hay mow and we’d play all kind of things.  We’d put on shows and we’d put on everything and I love an old barn – there’s just something about that.

Belle Baker (Belle Hutchinson) used to live up on the hill where the funeral home is now – the big funeral home just before you go into Morrow.  She used to call for me to come up there when they had pears and I used to climb up these wooden steps that were all broken to go up there and get pears.  I used to love to go there – she had the biggest cookie jar and always would give you the biggest cookies – she was my father’s aunt – my grandmother’s sister – and her sister and her husband lived there – Aunt Becky (Hutchinson) and Uncle Warren (Warren Brunson).  They didn’t have any children and I used to love to go and visit with them.  They were real old at that time and Aunt Becky always had a little clay pipe in her mouth turned upside-down.  They’re buried up in Morrow and I always remembered their grave – I loved that little old couple.

Alice Mae (Mount – Mother’s older sister) had it kind of rough.  She was a good little housekeeper and she had to take care of the little ones while Mom worked but we would always go to her if we wanted to do anything – we’d always ask her first.

Grandma school closeAlice Mae, ca 1925

Gr Helen and daughterAlice Mae and Mom (Helen), ca 1925

And I’m scared to death to be closed up in anything – I can’t stand ….any kind of a meeting or church or anything like that where they close the door and I can’t get out.  My sister told me the reason for that is one time my mother was sick and my father had to get someone to take care of her and the woman put us in a cupboard and shut the door on us – shut us up in that cupboard – and my sister would say – she was just 3 years older than me – I guess I must have been about 3 and her about 6, I don’t know – no, not that old ‘cause my father wasn’t dead yet – but she’d say, “Oh, we’re not going to get out and we’re scared, she’s not going to let us out” and to this day I can’t stand to have a door closed on me.

I had a very happy childhood – lived in Morrow and in the summertime the carnivals would come through and I loved when Bartone’s Tent Show would come through.  We’d go to all those tent shows and then we’d go home and we’d act out those shows.  Every once in a while down in the town square they’d have what they called the Punch and Judy Show and they would sell medicine.  They would put on this Punch and Judy act and I don’t know, it seems like there was something nice going on all the time.  We’d go to church on Sunday and I just had a very happy childhood all the way ‘round.

 

Epilogue:

Although each of my parents came from a troubled childhood and married when they were teenagers, they were determined to give my sister and me a stable family life and they did.  My father gave up the horse business and worked first on the WPA, then for the City of Cincinnati, for Dayton Acme during the last part of World War II, and then as a self-taught television repairman.  After I graduated from high school, he returned to the horse business he loved and stayed involved with that until he died on the track at the end of a race in 1978.

John A -family 1941 - CopyThe Applegates – Johnny, Martha,

Lillian and Shirley, 1943

Mother was the perfect stay-at-home Mom until my sister and I were grown.  She then went on to a long career and retirement from Shillito’s, a large Cincinnati department store.

MotherStoryA_0001Mother with her new White sewing machine in 1954.

She was wearing a dress she had just made – we thought the matching ruffles on the gloves were a nice touch.

In her 60s and 70s Mother finally got to dance as much as she wanted when she took round dance and square dance lessons and danced right up to the last months of her battle with breast cancer in 1991.

Mother died on July 31, 1991, and I sat under a clear blue sky in the back yard and wrote in my journal:

Mother went dancing today with her skirts swirling and petticoats flouncing, her golden red hair in perfect order and wearing her matching shoes and earrings.  She was smiling and light on her feet, happy at last to be able to promenade and do-si-do and twirl and swing.  She barely glanced back at the rest of us still struggling with our affairs.  She was going dancing!

Mother-memorial - CopyMother, ca 1981

This concludes my mother’s taped family stories from 1989.  It was the best gift she could have left for me.

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Mother’s Family Stories – Installment 11

My mother’s 100th birthday will be this November (Martha Evelyn Mount, born November 28, 1916, in Morrow, Ohio and passed away on July 31, 1991).  When she was 72 in 1989, she made a taped recording of family stories for both sides of the family.  In her honor, and still incredulous that she sat and dictated all of this into a tape recorder by herself, I’m going to post what she wrote along with pictures whenever possible.  She had a rather rambling, random method and said whatever came to her mind at that moment, punctuated by hearty laughing.   I’ll post the stories in the order she told them and will only edit the posts to keep out anything that might be offensive or embarrassing to other members of the family.

8/89 – Family Stories Tape by Martha Applegate
Transcribed 5/19/01 by Lillian – notes in parenthesis by Lillian

Installment 11

Ralph - 4 yrsRalph Mount, age 4 years

Don’t remember too much about my brother (Ralph Mount) – he was so much older than me but I remember he always had a car and I remember when I was little he had an old car.  I remember we were going over to Ft. Ancient and the durned old thing couldn’t make the hill and we had to get out and he put rocks behind the wheels and we had to walk up the hill so he could drive up the hill.

But he would take us for rides and he took us over to show us that big meteor or whatever it was that fell over there between Morrow and Lebanon  – a great big rock that was as big as a building.  Now, it’s  way down, it’s really small now but it’s still there.  He used to write stories – I think that’s where Nancy (my daughter, Nancy Breen) gets it – they were good stories, he could write real well and used to write stories and then he decided when he was about 18 or so he was going to be a magician.  And he was good at that.  He had me and my girlfriend – we used to put on little skits and sing songs and we’d sing Ramona, I can remember singing Ramona.  The only funny part was I always dressed like the little girl and sang alto and she dressed like the boy and sang soprano – that was kind of an odd mixture.  He belonged to the Juniors and he’d have us come over and he’d put on his magic act and we’d put on our little skit, but then he got married about that time and Hazel (Hazel Wilson) didn’t care for the magician part of it – she broke that up.

MotherStoryA_0001 (2)Ralph Mount, ca 1925

As long as I can remember I’ve always loved to dance.  My girlfriend and her mother liked to go to dances and she’d take us and we’d get out there on that floor – I was only about 10 years old – and we’d Charleston and we would dance and I’d go home and I’d wind up that old Victrola and put on records and I taught everybody around how to dance.  I taught Alice Mae (Mother’s older sister) and her girl friends, they’d come in and get me to teach them how to dance.  Alice Mae never could dance and she’d get so mad because I could teach them how to dance.  I guess I still love to dance to this day – I guess you never lose that.

Mom was good to us and she done very good – done as good as she could – she’d take in washings and do everything.  We were very poor but we always had nice holidays – nice Christmas and Thanksgiving and we always had good things – she’d see to that.  I remember one time when I was real little, the day before Thanksgiving the Ku Klux Klan came in – oh, it scared us all to death – they were all dressed in white with pointy hats and all you could see were their eyes, but they had a great big basket of, oh, everything – turkey and the whole bit – and we were scared to death but we didn’t even know them, of course, but we kind of suspected it was our next door neighbor because we’d be out of coal and Mom would say, “Just go down and see if you can scrape up some coal dust or
something to burn – just enough to get supper with” – we’d be out of coal, and we’d go down and that coal bin would be full of coal and we always kind of suspected the neighbor of putting it in there.  The Ku Klux might not have done any good but they were good to us.

Mother-Mable-AM-GM (4)Mom (Helen Conover) in her garden

Next time – the final installment of Mother’s stories.

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V-J Day in Cincinnati -1945

A post from five years ago – memories of VJ Day.

Lillian's Cupboard

In August of 1945, I was 12 years old, enjoying the last month of vacation before entering the 8th grade at old Highland School in the East End neighborhood of Cincinnati.

I was obsessed with the Cincinnati Reds who were just terrible that year, but I followed them on the radio, listening to Waite Hoyt’s expert calls interspersed with his stories about the 1927 Yankees where he had been a star pitcher and teammate of Babe Ruth.

V-E Day (the end of the war in Europe) had occurred in May and everyone was hoping and praying for the end of the war in Japan.  I remember seeing pictures in magazines of how things would be once the war was over.  I was particularly impressed with a picture of a candy store display that actually had chocolate bars along with the Chuckles gum drops, taffy and hard candy we were used…

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Mother’s Family Stories–Installment 10

My mother’s 100th birthday will be this November (Martha Evelyn Mount, born November 28, 1916, in Morrow, Ohio and passed away on July 31, 1991).  When she was 72 in 1989, she made a taped recording of family stories for both sides of the family.  In her honor, and still incredulous that she sat and dictated all of this into a tape recorder by herself, I’m going to post what she wrote along with pictures whenever possible.  She had a rather rambling, random method and said whatever came to her mind at that moment, punctuated by hearty laughing.   I’ll post the stories in the order she told them and will only edit the posts to keep out anything that might be offensive or embarrassing to other members of the family.

8/89 – Family Stories Tape by Martha Applegate
Transcribed 5/19/01 by Lillian – notes in parenthesis by Lillian

Mother-Mable-AM-GM (3)Friend Virginia and Mother (Martha Mount)

Wearing necklaces made of buckeyes

One time, I had a little friend named Virginia and she was crippled because she had infantile paralysis when she was little and Morrow had never had a fire engine – they always had the kind of engine that men had to pull and we had just gotten this new red fire engine this day.  This is the day that Virginia and I decided to go up in the graveyard.  Alice Mae (Mother’s older sister) and her friend, Jeanette, had told us that there was a monument up there that had six screws in it and had two hands pictured on it.  If you took those six screws out and you looked in there, those two hands would be shaking up and down, up and down.  This was the day Virginia and I decided to investigate and see if the hands were there.  We got one screw out and they let loose with that new fire engine siren and like to scared us to death and we took down over that hill.  I’d run a little ways then I’d wait for Virginia, then I’d run a little….and to this day there’s one screw missing in that monument.  I don’t think anybody ever did look in and see if the hands were there.

My daughter and I made a trip to Morrow on July 16, 2016, to visit the old cemetery.  We visited my grandfather’s grave and remembered how Mother considered the cemetery her personal playground because her father was buried there.

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The monument with the clasping hands is a big beautiful piece.

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We checked the “shaking hands” portion of the monument and the screws were all in place on this side….

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…but one is still missing from the back plate.

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Then one day Alice Mae and Jeanette – we never were allowed in the house, Alice Mae was a very good little housekeeper – she’d clean house and she wouldn’t let us in.  So, one day she told us, she said, “Come in the house”, her and her friend said.  We went in and everything was real dark and all of a sudden they jumped up from behind the davenport, they had two of Mom’s sheets on  – Mom would have killed them if she knew they had her sheets – and made like a ghost – like to scared us to death.

Mother StorybBrother Ralph and sister Alice Mae (with her Susie doll)

ca. 1916

One time when we were little and going to school we lived beside a preacher and Mabel (Mother’s younger sister) was little at the time and she called them the “peachie kids”.  We went to school one day and we used to always just go get our lunch and we’d just stand around the table and eat and Mom would always leave us money and we come home and the neighbor next door told us that the preacher’s kids – she looked over there and they were in the house, they were eating our lunch and taking the money.  So, Mom went to the preacher to ask him about it and he said…he got ahold of the kids then and yeah, they had candy and balloons and everything bought with the money and he made them give the balloons and everything to us and he gave Mom back her money but he said it was Mom’s fault because she tempted the kids by leaving money lay out.

MotherStoryA_0002The “peachie” kids

I used to love my grandmother – that was my father’s mother – and I’d go and see her  – oh, just any time I’d walk over and see her – she lived a couple of streets away from us.  But she was a very little woman, would rarely have anything to say.  Lillian reminds me so much of her.  The only thing I can ever remember her saying was – she’d look through those old bifocal glasses and she’d say, “New dress?  Did your mother make it?  Hmmmm.”  On cold winter days she’d have our cousins stop at school and tell us to stop in for dinner and she would have beans and dumplings and all kinds of jellies and relishes and all kinds of things like that – Lillian reminds me of her like that – just every kind of a jelly thing you could think of and oh, we loved that.

Minerva close-upMinerva Alice Hutchinson Mount, Mother’s paternal grandmother

Minerva Ralph HelenMy mother’s grandmother, older brother, Ralph, and mother

Next time, Mother will tell about her big brother, Ralph, and about some mysterious day-before-Thanksgiving visitors.

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My Mother’s Family Stories–Installment 9

My mother’s 100th birthday will be this November (Martha Evelyn Mount, born November 28, 1916, in Morrow, Ohio and passed away on July 31, 1991).  When she was 72 in 1989, she made a taped recording of family stories for both sides of the family.  In her honor, and still incredulous that she sat and dictated all of this into a tape recorder by herself, I’m going to post what she wrote along with pictures whenever possible.  She had a rather rambling, random method and said whatever came to her mind at that moment, punctuated by hearty laughing.   I’ll post the stories in the order she told them and will only edit the posts to keep out anything that might be offensive or embarrassing to other members of the family.

8/89 – Family Stories Tape by Martha Applegate
Transcribed 5/19/01 by Lillian – notes in parenthesis by Lillian

Installment 9

My earliest memories are of Mother telling stories of her wonderful childhood in Morrow, Ohio.  Times were hard:  her mother was widowed with three children and worked in a munitions factory in Kings Mill, Ohio (near where King’s Island amusement park is now).  She remarried and her husband left her when he found out she was pregnant.  She continued to work, leaving the housekeeping to little daughter Alice Mae and the general care of her toddler Mabel to my mother.  Mother always said they grew up like Topsy (the little girl in Uncle Tom’s Cabin) but at least she and Mabel had a lot of fun growing up Topsy-like in the little town of Morrow, Ohio.

Morrow 1910“If you want to go to Morrow, you can not go today,

for the train that goes to Morrow is already on its way.”

Railroad St., Morrow, Ohio – 1910

 

After my father died, Mom had a hard time raising all of us.  She remarried again (Fred Bailey) and when I was five, Mabel was born and, oh, I dearly loved her.  We played together and we had such good times together always.

Mother-Mable-AM-GM

Mother-Mable-AM-GM (2)Martha and Mabel, ca 1929

We used to go swimming every day in the little creek and we’d always go in, in an old dress.  We’d go down and there’d be a mud slide and we could slide right down into the water in the mud, but we’d always ask Alice Mae (Mother’s older sister) first.  Some days we liked to maybe go up and get some clay.  To get the clay we had to go through the grave yard and up the railroad track and around the bend and then come down over the hill where the water trickled and it would make clay.  We would take that home and you could just mold anything out of it, make little dishes and everything and play.  Some days we’d say we’d go to Flat Rock and I’d always put Mabel in my wagon wherever we went and I’d pull Mabel along – I was about 10 and Mabel was about 5.

Then some days we would go up to Irma’s, up the railroad track – Mom took care of her when she was having a baby and we knew her.  Every time we went she would go and she would kill a chicken and she’d have chicken and gravy – oh, and that tasted so good – that fried chicken.  And she’d take us down to the spring house, the milk house, where they set the pails of milk right down in the spring and it would be ice cold – oh, that milk tasted so good!  And she’d do it any time we’d come.

Then one day we were there we were told not to go into the orchard but we did anyway – we went into the orchard and climbed up a tree and we looked down and saw why we weren’t supposed to go in the orchard – there was a great big bull standing right under us.  We had to wait there until her husband could come and get us down.

Irma always liked for us to come because to go to town, to go to Morrow, she had to drive a horse and buggy and she was ashamed of it – nobody drove a horse and buggy in those days – that was 1925 – everybody had a car by that time.  So, she’d tie our wagon on the back and down we’d go over the hill and I’d get to drive the horse through the gate.  Oh, I thought that was wonderful – to drive that old horse down there.

Mabel and I one time we were playing in the graveyard – up there playing with our wagon and we thought we were allowed to go anywhere because my father was buried there and we’d slip in and we’d play cowboy and we’d ride that cannon like a horse and we rolled all the cannon balls down the hill – none of them are left, they’re all gone.  One day the caretaker told us that we weren’t allowed to ride our wagon down the hill and we were very insulted because my father was buried there and we could do anything.  I see they’ve got a sign up there that says NO WAGONS OR BICYCLES.  I think they put that there for us, but that was a long time ago.

mabel-mother-1940sMabel and Martha, ca 1948

Next, time Mother continues her stories about friends and family in her favorite place, Morrow, Ohio.

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